summit on service innovation

21 world cities reveal the winning solutions to improve lives of 110 million citizens

Twenty-one cities from Asia, Africa, Europe, North and Latin America have announced the winners of the Living Labs Global Award 2012 (LLGA 2012) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Award presented major urban challenges faced by cities such as Barcelona, San Francisco, Cape Town, Mexico City, Birmingham, Rio de Janeiro or Lagos, to which 555 companies from 50 countries responded by presenting their innovative solutions. Cities spend EUR 3.5 Trillion annually in public procurement, and technologies promise major efficiency, accessibility and service quality gains.

During the first world meeting in Latin America on the smart use of technologies and services, public leaders from 21 global cities have revealed the winning innovative solutions that best meet strategic challenges like Affordable Housing Units for Lagos (Nigeria), Data to Help Fight Obesity in Eindhoven (The Netherlands), Changing Private Car Use in Lavasa (India), Wireless Control of Urban Systems in San Francisco (USA), a Knowledge Square to enhance digital inclusion in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), Participation in Service Design and Delivery in Sant Cugat (Spain), Digital Public Transport in Mexico City (Mexico) and Engaging Visitors Experience in Barcelona (Spain). Winning solutions of the LLGA 2012 will now be piloted in the 21 participating cities over the next 12 months, to evaluate their impact to meet the pressing challenges.

 The winning solutions are:

 City of Barcelona (Spain): Contactless tags to bridge real and physical worlds, by Connecthings

City of Birmingham (UK): Composting on-site in Green Communities, by Susteco AB

City of Cáceres (Spain): Sustainable Cities. Motion is Energy, by OTEM2000 - Green Solutions & Management S.L.

City of Cape Town (South Africa):  Cape GeniUS!, by SCY

City of Coventry (UK): HLG SYSTEM, by GLASS COVER Europe S.L.

City of Derry~Londonderry (UK): Contactless tags to bridge real and physical worlds, by Connecthings

City of Eindhoven (The Netherlands): The App that gets teenagers moving, by GGD Brabant-Zuidoost

City of Fukuoka (Japan): Smart PathFinder, by Where 2 Get It, Inc.

City of Glasgow (UK): SmartCity Málaga, by Endesa

City of Guadalajara (Mexico): Guadalajara: Keeping Road Surfaces in Top Condition, by Falcon Road Maintenance Equipment

City of Hamburg (Germany): Contactless tags to bridge real and physical worlds, by Connecthings

City of Kristiansand (Norway): City Direct, by Innovation Center Iceland

City of Lagos (Nigeria): Lagos state Housing Solution, by TEMPOHOUSING NIGERIA LIMITED

City of Lavasa (India): SKYBUS, by Skybus

Mexico City (Mexico): Modern Urban Transport Information, by Clever Devices

City of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil): Contactless tags to bridge real and physical worlds, by Connecthings

Rome - Lazio Region (Italy): Get on board and play with bUS, by Placemaking srl

City of San Francisco (USA): From Street Lighting Management to Advanced Smart City Services, by Paradox Engineering

City of Sant Cugat (Spain): MindMixer, by MindMixer.com

City of Santiago de Chile (Chile): SFpark - A New way of managing parking, by San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency

City of Terrassa (Spain): CityWalking, by UPC BarcelonaTech

In a unique global effort, 555 technology solutions from about 50 countries submitted to the Living Labs Global Award 2012 in February, while 109 were shortlisted in March. Winners have been selected after an international two-round jury process involving 147 jurors, under the auspices of Living Labs Global, a non-profit association based in Copenhagen and Barcelona working with 50 cities and 1,000 companies around the world to promote service innovation in cities. The Living Labs Global Award is a unique global process providing full accountability in the evaluation through independent experts. The LLGA 2012 was promoted by 21 global cities in partnership with Living Labs Global, Citymart.com, Oracle and The Climate Group.

The LLGA 2012 Ceremony of 2 May was attended by 200 participants from 22 countries in Rio de Janeiro as part of the Rio Summit on Service Innovation in Cities.

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 “Today we have witnessed a major commitment towards meeting some of the world’s pressing urban challenges, with the goal of improving the lives of more than 50% of the world’s population by using clean technologies, smart services and better accessibility. The winners will now have the opportunity to implement their solutions in real-life, and work together with stakeholders in the 21 partner cities to prove their impact,” said Sascha Haselmayer, Co-Founder of Living Labs Global.

 The Living Labs Global Award 2012 has been an important event for the City of Rio de Janeiro, which will soon host the Football World Cup and the Olympic Games. We thrive upon knowledge and innovation and this Summit exchanges experience and cutting-edge solutions. It has been a very successful event. Through the Living Labs Global Award 2012 we received 109 solutions that will help us to develop our Knowledge Square, which is being implemented in 6 areas of the city and aims to enhance digital inclusion across Rio de Janeiro,” said Franklin Coelho, Secretary of Science and Technology of the City of Rio de Janeiro, host city and partner of the LLGA 2012.

The cities will be considered at the cutting edge of innovation and progress, as contactless technologies and associated mobile services are about to revolutionize mobile usages. They will also enjoy a new two-channel interactive communication tool, visible and accessible to everyone which is particularly important for an emerging global city. Connecthings will be glad to benefit from such prestigious international references and to demonstrate that its solutions are flexible and adaptable to cities’ diverse challenges,” said Damaris Homo, Business Development Manager at Connecthings, winner of four LLGA 2012, including the categories of Rio de Janeiro and Barcelona.

With initiatives like the Living Labs Global Award 2012 we are transforming Barcelona into a platform for innovation. We would like to see successful projects in the city being replicated in others, such as Rio de Janeiro or Paris, to name a few. The city of Rio as the host of the next Football World Cup and the Olympic Games must also think about their legacy and how the infrastructure will bring benefits to its citizens in the future, said Josep M. Piqué, Strategic Sectors Director, 22@ Barcelona, partner city of the LLGA 2012.

“Over 50% of the world population lives in cities and only by having them on our side will we win the battle against pollution and build a better world. We have to disseminate the Clean Revolution to city leaders, said Molly Webb, Head of Smart Technologies, The Climate Group, partner of the LLGA 2012.

On the second day of the meeting, May 3, during the Rio Summit on Service Innovation in Cities, 200 delegates from 22 countries, including public leaders from 30 international cities and pioneering entrepreneurs driving social and technological innovation are engaging in matchmaking activities to foster partnerships and dialogues on the investment priorities of participating cities: Urban Systems & Services, Health & Wellbeing, Open Government & Accessibility, Clean and Green Cities, Tourism & Mobility.

On May 4, delegates join LLGA 2012 local immersion programme to experience some of the ground-breaking projects, such as the Change through Digital Inclusion (CDI) programme in the favelas of Rio de Janeiro, now adopted by 717 communities in 14 countries.

About Citymart.com

Citymart.coml is a non-profit association based in Copenhagen (Denmark) and Barcelona (Spain), working with 50 cities and 1,000 companies and research centres in Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas with a mission to open the market for service innovation in cities and overcoming key technology, organisation and trade barriers. The Living Labs Global Award is an annual process over 8 months in which cities present their challenges and provide guidance to the business and technology community on future investment plans and needs. Solution providers respond by submitting existing technologies as entries for evaluation by an international jury.

Previous LLGA winners

Some of the winners of LLGA since 2010 include SOCRATA, whose solution has been implemented by San Francisco to power the city’s new cloud-based Open Data site, URBIOTICA’s intelligent waste management sensors for recycling containers and WORRLDSENSING’s cutting-edge urban smart parking solution.

Facts:

More than 557,000 local governments provide services to more than 50% of the world’s population with an annual spending of 3.5 Trillion Euros per year. New technologies can radically improve transport and mobility, urban systems and services, open government, health and wellbeing and other key areas of urban life.

More information on www.llga.org

Follow us on Twitter (@LLGACities), Facebook.com/citymartcom and Linkedin

Why are US Cities Slow to Adopt Innovation?

As noted in our last post, American cities are lagging behind others (like Eindhoven, Stockholm, and Barcelona) in the adoption of innovative service technologies.  Funding is one large barrier, and perhaps the most important.  However, other barriers exist that, if addressed, could increase the feasibility of funding for what are often thought of as risky investments. Evaluation and Evidence

It’s a bit of a chicken and egg problem.  Really cutting edge technologies will have no evidence to back themselves up when they are first launched.  Early adopters cannot be risk averse, must trust their intuition, or both.  This is challenging for city governments.

Additionally, even when evidence is available, for early technologies the evidence often comes from foreign countries or different cultural contexts.  Cities need to be able to apply what has worked elsewhere to the local context in a convincing way.  In order to mitigate this barrier for other potential adopters, and for a city’s own financial health, an evaluation program needs to be incorporated into the technology adoption process to prove or disprove the innovation’s smart and sustainable claims.

Lastly, without evidence, it is difficult to prove a relative advantage of the technology – will it improve the status quo?  This is a complex question; the technology may be good for some and bad for others raising equity concerns, which, if realized, are bad for society, and even if not, are difficult doubts to overcome at the outset of an innovative proposal.

Physical and Environmental Variables

Our existing physical environment can produce barriers to innovation adoption as well.   This article from Slate highlights the challenge of adopting service-providing robots in the complex, random dynamic urban environments of modern cities.

Dero Bike Rack Company produced the ZAP!, a solar-powered device that counts passing bicycles as part of an employer-based bicycle riding encouragement program.  While their device shows a lot of promise for decreasing vehicle miles traveled on a localized level, the city of Minneapolis has faced challenges in implementing it.  While the city desires to invest in the technology city-wide, they have found a challenge in the divided nature of our urban space – private property owners don’t want to install the device on their building unless it will have a direct benefit for their tenants.  Again, this is difficult to prove for a new technology.

Communication Channels

Communication channels are the bloodstream of innovation diffusion.  The current governmental budget crunch has led to less money for travel, less conference attendance, and less spreading of ideas.  This highlights the importance of the internet as a means of information spreading (e.g. webinars, forums, blogs, even interest-based listservs).

Citizens themselves are becoming more comfortable with mobile and web technologies.  This level of comfort needs to be communicated to decision makers and leveraged as evidence of the potential success of new communications technologies and social media.

Persuasive Local Champions

If communication channels are the bloodstream, then local champions are the heart of innovation diffusion.  Someone needs to identify the barriers and develop strategies to break them down.  This person needs to be tireless and to empower others to advocate as well.

Going back the case of Dero Bike Racks, because the company is located in Minneapolis, it has seen all ZAP adoption within that city.   There is a sense of trust due to this proximity, which has created a local champion within the government.  This case highlights the opportunity for technology companies to partner with the cities in which they are located to pilot, test, and evaluate their innovations.

The Summit in November will undoubtedly address many of these challenges.  If these barriers can be mitigated, innovative service technologies will be viewed as less risky, less costly, and more advantageous, increasing the ability for cities for find funding for cost-saving investments.

-          Terra Curtis

 

Why are US Cities Slow to Adopt Innovation?

As noted in our last post, American cities are lagging behind others (like Eindhoven, Stockholm, and Barcelona) in the adoption of innovative service technologies.  Funding is one large barrier, and perhaps the most important.  However, other barriers exist that, if addressed, could increase the feasibility of funding for what are often thought of as risky investments. Evaluation and Evidence

It’s a bit of a chicken and egg problem.  Really cutting edge technologies will have no evidence to back themselves up when they are first launched.  Early adopters cannot be risk averse, must trust their intuition, or both.  This is challenging for city governments.

Additionally, even when evidence is available, for early technologies the evidence often comes from foreign countries or different cultural contexts.  Cities need to be able to apply what has worked elsewhere to the local context in a convincing way.  In order to mitigate this barrier for other potential adopters, and for a city’s own financial health, an evaluation program needs to be incorporated into the technology adoption process to prove or disprove the innovation’s smart and sustainable claims.

Lastly, without evidence, it is difficult to prove a relative advantage of the technology – will it improve the status quo?  This is a complex question; the technology may be good for some and bad for others raising equity concerns, which, if realized, are bad for society, and even if not, are difficult doubts to overcome at the outset of an innovative proposal.

Physical and Environmental Variables

Our existing physical environment can produce barriers to innovation adoption as well.   This article from Slate highlights the challenge of adopting service-providing robots in the complex, random dynamic urban environments of modern cities.

Dero Bike Rack Company produced the ZAP!, a solar-powered device that counts passing bicycles as part of an employer-based bicycle riding encouragement program.  While their device shows a lot of promise for decreasing vehicle miles traveled on a localized level, the city of Minneapolis has faced challenges in implementing it.  While the city desires to invest in the technology city-wide, they have found a challenge in the divided nature of our urban space – private property owners don’t want to install the device on their building unless it will have a direct benefit for their tenants.  Again, this is difficult to prove for a new technology.

Communication Channels

Communication channels are the bloodstream of innovation diffusion.  The current governmental budget crunch has led to less money for travel, less conference attendance, and less spreading of ideas.  This highlights the importance of the internet as a means of information spreading (e.g. webinars, forums, blogs, even interest-based listservs).

Citizens themselves are becoming more comfortable with mobile and web technologies.  This level of comfort needs to be communicated to decision makers and leveraged as evidence of the potential success of new communications technologies and social media.

Persuasive Local Champions

If communication channels are the bloodstream, then local champions are the heart of innovation diffusion.  Someone needs to identify the barriers and develop strategies to break them down.  This person needs to be tireless and to empower others to advocate as well.

Going back the case of Dero Bike Racks, because the company is located in Minneapolis, it has seen all ZAP adoption within that city.   There is a sense of trust due to this proximity, which has created a local champion within the government.  This case highlights the opportunity for technology companies to partner with the cities in which they are located to pilot, test, and evaluate their innovations.

The Summit in November will undoubtedly address many of these challenges.  If these barriers can be mitigated, innovative service technologies will be viewed as less risky, less costly, and more advantageous, increasing the ability for cities for find funding for cost-saving investments.

-          Terra Curtis

 

Upcoming Summit on Service Innovation in Cities

amiando header 3 R7 2011-7-26Living Labs’ staff recently attended Oracle’s OpenWorld conference in San Francisco.  We wrote about five main takeaways:

  1. Politicians are talking the talk but not walking the walk – requests for technologies’ sustainability services are not backed up with funding opportunities
  2. Cities need to embrace the idea of piloting, evaluation, learning, and buying (we have seen this strategy succeed in the private sector, particularly among technology companies, and in select cities)
  3. Cities can more effectively advocate for innovative solutions if a coalition of citizens understand the benefits of change
  4. Technology offers the opportunity not only to cut costs but also to add value
  5. Cities need to adopt the philosophy that service cuts are not the only way to deal with recessionary budget issues

One of the ways in which Living Labs Global is promoting these ideas is through our Summit on Service Innovation in Cities, to be held November 23 – 24, 2011.  At the Summit, cities, companies, and experts will come together to address the need for the diffusion of innovations into cities along three main themes: smart urban lighting; e-health and smart living; and wellbeing and the role of business innovation, new financing, and social entrepreneurship.

Make sure to keep an eye on our blog in the meantime as we will be dedicating several posts to these themes.

-Terra Curtis

 

Upcoming Summit on Service Innovation in Cities

amiando header 3 R7 2011-7-26Living Labs’ staff recently attended Oracle’s OpenWorld conference in San Francisco.  We wrote about five main takeaways:

  1. Politicians are talking the talk but not walking the walk – requests for technologies’ sustainability services are not backed up with funding opportunities
  2. Cities need to embrace the idea of piloting, evaluation, learning, and buying (we have seen this strategy succeed in the private sector, particularly among technology companies, and in select cities)
  3. Cities can more effectively advocate for innovative solutions if a coalition of citizens understand the benefits of change
  4. Technology offers the opportunity not only to cut costs but also to add value
  5. Cities need to adopt the philosophy that service cuts are not the only way to deal with recessionary budget issues

One of the ways in which Living Labs Global is promoting these ideas is through our Summit on Service Innovation in Cities, to be held November 23 – 24, 2011.  At the Summit, cities, companies, and experts will come together to address the need for the diffusion of innovations into cities along three main themes: smart urban lighting; e-health and smart living; and wellbeing and the role of business innovation, new financing, and social entrepreneurship.

Make sure to keep an eye on our blog in the meantime as we will be dedicating several posts to these themes.

-Terra Curtis