mobile apps

Integrating London's public transportation options

Many cities today are striving to create dense, well-connected public transportation networks that reduce auto-dependence, mitigate congestion, and provide a variety of travel alternatives. Unfortunately, the complexity of large transit systems can be daunting even for native residents, especially when users need to transfer from one type of transportation to another. Juggling transit schedules, maps, and route listings just to get from Point A to B can make public transportation an unattractive option for some. Enter the smartphone users, who might say, “Well, isn’t there an app for that?” And they’re right – mobile apps for public transit systems abound. Having access to real-time service information, station locator tools, and interactive maps can make public transit a much more viable option for many. However, in most cities these apps only provide information on a single mode of transportation. If you need to transfer from a bus to a subway line, for instance, you would have to toggle between two apps for schedules and travel times. Taking bike share? Add a third app. And so on.

Mobile apps are designed to make our lives easier and save time, but few have been able to tackle the complexities of urban public transportation networks in a way that helps to connect users to the multitude of travel options that cities have to offer. The Travel London mobile app from Urban Times aims to do just that. It provides real-time information on bus routes, tube lines, and bike share stations throughout the city, allowing users to easily compare and combine different travel options.

While it’s of course great for residents, an all-in-one transportation app is especially useful for visitors who are trying to navigate an unfamiliar city. Being able to easily find all of the travel information you need in a single place makes a city instantly more accessible and tourist-friendly. And with the summer Olympic Games fast approaching, Travel London is doing its part to make the city an open and inviting place.

~ Allison Bullock

Chromaroma. The Name Doesn’t Matter – It’s Cool!

I’ve never been a gamer. Even back in the days of early Atari, Sega, and Nintendo systems, I never got much beyond the 3rd or 4th level of Super Mario Bros. I just couldn’t bring myself to care about these fantastical worlds. But with today’s technology, games aren’t just about fantasy anymore. They take place in the world around us, intimately integrated with our lives, and we are the very characters in search of points, credits, and check-ins. And I am starting to come around. [vimeo http://www.vimeo.com/22023369 w=400&h=225]

Chromaroma from Mudlark on Vimeo.

I stumbled upon Chromaroma a couple days ago, a mobile app developed by Mudlark in the UK that turns riding The Tube into a social game. Poking around its website, I realized that all games are really just about incentives, and as any self-respecting economist will tell you, people respond to incentives. Chromaroma incentivizes riding public transport by giving riders points for each ride and sending them on missions to “capture” stations and identify unique locations along The Tube (like the station where Jerry Springer was born).

The game excites me not as much for its current use, but for its potential. Transport for London should seize this opportunity to make a public-private partnership. Mudlark now owns some extremely valuable data for the agency (it reminds me a lot of the data collected by San Francisco County Transportation Agency’s CycleTracks app). They can tell you when people travel, where they travel from, where they travel to, and whether they use a diversity of transit lines or mainly rely on it for commuting purposes. Depending on how widespread the game gets, it could even provide a measure of how overcrowded particular lines get – a metric for prioritizing transit investment.

The private sector has clearly seized on the opportunity technology presented to capture ubiquitous travel data. Let’s hope the public sector rides that wave as well.

-          Terra Curtis

Chromaroma. The Name Doesn’t Matter – It’s Cool!

I’ve never been a gamer. Even back in the days of early Atari, Sega, and Nintendo systems, I never got much beyond the 3rd or 4th level of Super Mario Bros. I just couldn’t bring myself to care about these fantastical worlds. But with today’s technology, games aren’t just about fantasy anymore. They take place in the world around us, intimately integrated with our lives, and we are the very characters in search of points, credits, and check-ins. And I am starting to come around. [vimeo http://www.vimeo.com/22023369 w=400&h=225]

Chromaroma from Mudlark on Vimeo.

I stumbled upon Chromaroma a couple days ago, a mobile app developed by Mudlark in the UK that turns riding The Tube into a social game. Poking around its website, I realized that all games are really just about incentives, and as any self-respecting economist will tell you, people respond to incentives. Chromaroma incentivizes riding public transport by giving riders points for each ride and sending them on missions to “capture” stations and identify unique locations along The Tube (like the station where Jerry Springer was born).

The game excites me not as much for its current use, but for its potential. Transport for London should seize this opportunity to make a public-private partnership. Mudlark now owns some extremely valuable data for the agency (it reminds me a lot of the data collected by San Francisco County Transportation Agency’s CycleTracks app). They can tell you when people travel, where they travel from, where they travel to, and whether they use a diversity of transit lines or mainly rely on it for commuting purposes. Depending on how widespread the game gets, it could even provide a measure of how overcrowded particular lines get – a metric for prioritizing transit investment.

The private sector has clearly seized on the opportunity technology presented to capture ubiquitous travel data. Let’s hope the public sector rides that wave as well.

-          Terra Curtis

Health Help

Two more partner cities, Terrassa, Spain and Eindhoven, The Netherlands, are looking for solutions to create a healthy living environment. Eindhoven notes that good health is a primary determinant of happiness; Terrassa takes a more practical view by recognizing the need to promote prevention in public health. But regardless of the reason, both cities want to help their citizens maintain healthier lifestyles. MIYO is a web-based tool for developing health-related materials to remind and inform patients of the need to obtain colorectal cancer screening. Its unique approach uses health behavior theory, which suggests that messages that include images and messaging that are tailored to the individual produce higher rates of healthy actions. MIYO was developed by researchers at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri with funding from the Centers for Disease Control.

While cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States (as of 2007), deaths resulting from accidental injuries (like from automobile accidents) rank highly as well. Students competing in Microsoft’s Imagine Cup, which challenged students to “imagine a world where technology helps solve the toughest problems,” developed an app to help reduce traffic accidents. Team Hermes, the developers, wanted to address head-on the 1.2 million traffic deaths per year.  Their “boy racer” app makes a game out of driving – one that encourages young male drivers to pay more attention to their driving rather than less. The game rewards points for good driving, which is determined by g-forces, revs, speed, and throttle position, and places these drivers in direct competition with others similar to them. Winners get more than points – insurance companies are willing to provide lower premiums to drivers who score well in the game.

Both solutions are low cost methods through which public health agencies can promote healthy living environments and behavior in their cities.

-          Terra Curtis

Health Help

Two more partner cities, Terrassa, Spain and Eindhoven, The Netherlands, are looking for solutions to create a healthy living environment. Eindhoven notes that good health is a primary determinant of happiness; Terrassa takes a more practical view by recognizing the need to promote prevention in public health. But regardless of the reason, both cities want to help their citizens maintain healthier lifestyles. MIYO is a web-based tool for developing health-related materials to remind and inform patients of the need to obtain colorectal cancer screening. Its unique approach uses health behavior theory, which suggests that messages that include images and messaging that are tailored to the individual produce higher rates of healthy actions. MIYO was developed by researchers at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri with funding from the Centers for Disease Control.

While cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States (as of 2007), deaths resulting from accidental injuries (like from automobile accidents) rank highly as well. Students competing in Microsoft’s Imagine Cup, which challenged students to “imagine a world where technology helps solve the toughest problems,” developed an app to help reduce traffic accidents. Team Hermes, the developers, wanted to address head-on the 1.2 million traffic deaths per year.  Their “boy racer” app makes a game out of driving – one that encourages young male drivers to pay more attention to their driving rather than less. The game rewards points for good driving, which is determined by g-forces, revs, speed, and throttle position, and places these drivers in direct competition with others similar to them. Winners get more than points – insurance companies are willing to provide lower premiums to drivers who score well in the game.

Both solutions are low cost methods through which public health agencies can promote healthy living environments and behavior in their cities.

-          Terra Curtis

Make Yourself at Home: Tourism Solutions

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GBKy-hSedg8&w=440&h=253] Four of our partner cities this award round are interested in finding solutions to issues of tourism (Barcelona, Derry-Londonderry, Hamburg, and Fukuoka).  What with tourism being the world’s largest service sector industry, 5th or 6th overall, and the need of cities to attract tax revenue from non-residents, it makes sense that so many cities see tremendous value in attracting more tourists.

As I am not intimately familiar with its mechanisms and recent innovations, I did a quick news search for “tourism industry.”  One of the first stories was about Aurasma, the “world’s first visual browser.”  The video at the top demonstrates the mobile app’s incredible power.  The app allows you to point your smartphone at any image or vista in front of you (actual reality) and over it impose an image (augmented reality).  While it’s simply fun to use, it offers tremendous opportunity for the tourism industry – Mexico and Hawaii are currently testing it out.

In a related search, several tourism-related companies showed up in TechCrunch’s CrunchBase, a database of start-ups.  Tourism Radio caught my eye.  This radio is “tuned to the listener” – a device put into rental cars and, using GPS and customer inputs, delivers individualized information about the area through which the tourist drives.

Related is hummba, a social and travel networking site that users can access through a mobile app to access free travel guides and share travel experiences.

I’m starting to think these apps could provide value to residents and tourists alike – you never know what your neighborhood used to look like.  What better way to engage more deeply with your environment?

-          Terra Curtis

The Power of Information

UC BerkeleyThis post by the blog Greater Greater Washington (GGW) called to mind a study published earlier this year about Tech for Transit.  We covered the article and highlighted its finding that it’s not so much ownership of an automobile that drives transportation choices, but rather ownership of the trip one is about to make.  Technology, specifically mobile apps that provide information about trip lengths, costs, and directions, can provide people with a sense of ownership over their trip that induces more public transit use.

GGW, in collaboration with the Mobility Lab (a project of the Arlington County Community Services) and OpenPlans, is working on a project to develop mobile apps and physical maps for Washington, DC that could provide people with the information they need in order to feel ownership over their trips.

Using London’s “spider maps” as a model, GGW envisions building software to automatically generate a sort of transportation choice map, which includes the various options such as bus, rail, or Capital Bikeshare, centered around any point in Washington (depending on where the person is standing).  They suggest hotels using it to hand out to tourists or realtors to potential homebuyers.  The sentiment reflected in comments on GGW’s post suggests these maps are needed and wanted.

- Terra Curtis

 

Preparing the Populace, 2.0

Despite my enthusiasm for this use case, municipal mobile apps aren’t only good for data collection – they can also be used for information dissemination.  Such is the purpose of the Bay Bridge Explorer app, a driving simulator for iPhone and iPad developed in partnership with a coalition of government agencies including Caltrans, the Bay Area Toll Authority, and the California Transportation Commission.Bay Bridge app The San Francisco – Oakland Bridge is currently undergoing major construction for seismic retrofits.  The project, which is expected to be complete by the end of 2013, involves several temporary or sectional changes to the traffic pattern before its completion.  Caltrans learned the hard way when one of the early changes, the infamous s-curve, led to the death of a truck driver who entered the curve 10 mph faster than he should have.  Then, they responded by installing more and brighter signage.

Now, they’re acting preventatively by providing drivers the opportunity to test the bridge’s new alignment before actually encountering it from behind the wheel.   Users of the Bay Bridge Explorer app are able to simulate the driving experience and also see very detailed birds-eye view visualizations of the new structure.

So far the app has received some bad reviews because it is so detailed and causing systems to crash.  But, bugs are being worked out, and I’m hopeful that it can help prepare at least some for the new pattern they should expect.

- Terra Curtis

 

Preparing the Populace, 2.0

Despite my enthusiasm for this use case, municipal mobile apps aren’t only good for data collection – they can also be used for information dissemination.  Such is the purpose of the Bay Bridge Explorer app, a driving simulator for iPhone and iPad developed in partnership with a coalition of government agencies including Caltrans, the Bay Area Toll Authority, and the California Transportation Commission.Bay Bridge app The San Francisco – Oakland Bridge is currently undergoing major construction for seismic retrofits.  The project, which is expected to be complete by the end of 2013, involves several temporary or sectional changes to the traffic pattern before its completion.  Caltrans learned the hard way when one of the early changes, the infamous s-curve, led to the death of a truck driver who entered the curve 10 mph faster than he should have.  Then, they responded by installing more and brighter signage.

Now, they’re acting preventatively by providing drivers the opportunity to test the bridge’s new alignment before actually encountering it from behind the wheel.   Users of the Bay Bridge Explorer app are able to simulate the driving experience and also see very detailed birds-eye view visualizations of the new structure.

So far the app has received some bad reviews because it is so detailed and causing systems to crash.  But, bugs are being worked out, and I’m hopeful that it can help prepare at least some for the new pattern they should expect.

- Terra Curtis

 

CityRyde wants your Input

CityRyde are self-proclaimed bike sharing experts, helping clients pitch, implement, and operate bike sharing systems.  Since 2007, the company has been advising clients, and in 2009 released Spark, “the world’s first off-the-shelf software to manage bike shares.”  Today, they’re investigating the potential usefulness of a smartphone app that would pay you to do socially good or green-conscious actions, like riding your bike.  They’ve invited all interested parties to take a survey on the topic. CityRyde already has some interesting case studies, and I suspect they will have even more when they figure out a way to leverage financial incentives to increase bike riding.  (They’ve just hired a web and mobile app developer to aid in the creation of the app).  They currently offer three tech solutions: Spark (mentioned above), Inspire (carbon credit management software), and Ride Off Carbon (a mobile carbon footprint tracker).

Currently, CityRyde is working with two municipalities and six other clients.  Cornell University, Pottstown, Pennsylvania, and The Related Companies LP have all recently adopted part of their solution.  Cornell will use Spark as part of its new campus bike share system.  Pottsdam is providing a bike share less focused on commuting and more on touring local historical sites, and Related Companies will utilize Spark for bike shares at apartment complexes worldwide.

- Terra Curtis

 

Layar

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EtpNx7Y14d0&w=440&h=278] Layar is a mobile phone app-developing company based in Amsterdam.  The premise of their app, also called Layar, is augmented reality.  They’ve received two funding rounds so far for a total of €13.4 million with partial financial support from Intel Capital.  They were highlighted at Google Zeitgeist, named a 2011 Technology Pioneer by the World Economic Forum and TIME Magazine.  They won the title “Disruptive Innovatorat” at the 2010 Deloitte Fast50 and won Grand Prix 2010 at Netexplorateur.  Needless to say, if they’re not big now, big names think they’ll be big in the future.

So, what’s all the hype about?  If you watch the video above you’ll get a taste of it.  The real brilliance of this app is its simplicity.  Layar has taken an extremely complex topic (merging the virtual and real worlds) with infinite dimensions (history, future, gaming, education, entertainment, engagement, etc) and made it not only accessible but intuitive.  It makes you wonder, ‘why didn’t I think of that?’

In its current state, it feels like a fun toy, but I think it has the potential to be quite a game changer.  I’ve used it to check out crime in my area with SpotCrime.  From anywhere, I turn on the app and point my camera outward and Layar displays crime icons over the backdrop of my actual surroundings.  It’s really powerful, and that’s just the tip of the iceberg.  It’s essentially a platform for all spatial data, and we’re not just talking about shapefiles for a static GIS.  These data are real time, often created by you or your friends (e.g. Yelp, Flickr, Foursquare) or even by the local government (e.g. PlanningAlerts).

Use of Layar has the potential to engage more citizens more actively in their local surroundings.  It can help planners translate development proposals into real images that citizens can see while walking down the street.  It can enhance impact assessment, where developers, city officials, planners, and citizens can visualize what facilitating automobile use will do to congestion and to the public realm.  Check it out and see what you think it can do for you.

-Terra Curtis

Tech + Transit

By now, this article has made the rounds among transit advocates and techies, at least in the US.  I’m hoping to spread it to Europe now, but especially to readers of this blog who I think will be particularly enthused.mbta app A recent study conducted by Latitude Research and Next American City reveals that new technologies and improved access to information can encourage transit use.  They sampled 18 individuals aged 24 - 51 from Boston and San Francisco who are regular car drivers and asked them to go car-free for a week.  They were tracked by GPS, surveyed about their perceptions of mobility before and after the study, and engaged in group discussions using the web throughout the study.  Boston and San Francisco were chosen due to their recent commitment to open data solutions and technological initiatives.

The study is summarized by three main insights:

  • Information can equalize transit choices
    • Participants rated convenience, control, and flexibility as their highest values for mobility.
    • Location-aware mobile apps provide real-time information about the trade-offs between different routes and modes of travel, extending a feeling of convenience, control, and flexibility to transit.
  • Lose a car, gain a community
    • The majority of participants felt reconnected to their neighbors and their community by riding transit or adopting other non-automobile oriented transportation.
    • Mobile apps can enhance the off-line, real-world experience by connecting individuals to others while traveling.
  • Alternative transit is good for me and we
    • Participants gained insight into the environmental, health, and economic/financial benefits of car-free lifestyle.
    • Readily accessible information, largely available through the use of mobile apps, allows for empathy formation and an increased understanding of their own and others’ preferences and values.

This study serves to legitimize what many of us has believed for a long time.  It goes further to say there’s great value in deprivation, where individuals learn by doing and experiencing, rather than by being preached at by an advocacy crowd.  I hope this study gets expanded to a larger group, comparing the behaviors and experiences of those in tech-enabled cities (e.g. Boston and San Francisco) to areas who have not yet adapted these innovations.  I’d also like to hear thoughts about how this type of experiential learning can be extended beyond the world of research and into policies of programs of municipalities.  Bike to work and school week seem like promising opportunities.

-Terra Curtis

Tech + Transit

By now, this article has made the rounds among transit advocates and techies, at least in the US.  I’m hoping to spread it to Europe now, but especially to readers of this blog who I think will be particularly enthused.mbta app A recent study conducted by Latitude Research and Next American City reveals that new technologies and improved access to information can encourage transit use.  They sampled 18 individuals aged 24 - 51 from Boston and San Francisco who are regular car drivers and asked them to go car-free for a week.  They were tracked by GPS, surveyed about their perceptions of mobility before and after the study, and engaged in group discussions using the web throughout the study.  Boston and San Francisco were chosen due to their recent commitment to open data solutions and technological initiatives.

The study is summarized by three main insights:

  • Information can equalize transit choices
    • Participants rated convenience, control, and flexibility as their highest values for mobility.
    • Location-aware mobile apps provide real-time information about the trade-offs between different routes and modes of travel, extending a feeling of convenience, control, and flexibility to transit.
  • Lose a car, gain a community
    • The majority of participants felt reconnected to their neighbors and their community by riding transit or adopting other non-automobile oriented transportation.
    • Mobile apps can enhance the off-line, real-world experience by connecting individuals to others while traveling.
  • Alternative transit is good for me and we
    • Participants gained insight into the environmental, health, and economic/financial benefits of car-free lifestyle.
    • Readily accessible information, largely available through the use of mobile apps, allows for empathy formation and an increased understanding of their own and others’ preferences and values.

This study serves to legitimize what many of us has believed for a long time.  It goes further to say there’s great value in deprivation, where individuals learn by doing and experiencing, rather than by being preached at by an advocacy crowd.  I hope this study gets expanded to a larger group, comparing the behaviors and experiences of those in tech-enabled cities (e.g. Boston and San Francisco) to areas who have not yet adapted these innovations.  I’d also like to hear thoughts about how this type of experiential learning can be extended beyond the world of research and into policies of programs of municipalities.  Bike to work and school week seem like promising opportunities.

-Terra Curtis

Mobile Services Forecast

It seems like every day we hear more about the endless development possibilities offered by mobile technology beyond the basics of connectivity and communication. “The Economist” recently offered a good round-up of some of the most innovative and clever new services being offered. Rather than complicated applications for expensive smartphones, these initiatives focus on offering solutions for everyday problems in poorer countries where cheap mobile phones are becoming increasingly popular.As the article points out, even in poorer countries about two thirds of the population usually have access to a mobile phone. This has sparked a rise in mobile services for cheaper phones that go beyond simple voice calling and texting, similar to the boom in mobile application development with the growing popularity of smartphones in wealthier countries. Though the article is quick to point out that the number of people actually using these services is still relatively small: “even among young people in South-East Asia (a tech-friendly lot) only 8% had used more than “voice-services” according to a poll by LIRNEasia [a think tank in Sri Lanka].”

Still, many of these services are growing their user base and given the convenience—and sometimes lifesaving—services they provide, it’s easy to see why. Here are a few of the mobile services that caught our eye: --mPedigree: Currently offered in Ghana and Nigeria, where the fake-drug trade is a concern, this service allows users to text a serial number on the packaging of their medicine and receive a response in seconds indicating whether or not it’s genuine and safe. Not only does the service have the potential to save lives, it’s also free for users; pharmaceutical companies foot the bill in the interest of stopping counterfeiters. --Dialog Tradenet: Among the many mobile trading platforms being offered, Dialog allows farmers in Sri Lanka to check prices and text in offers. Farmer’s Friend is a similar service being offered in Uganda. Though many of the earliest trading platforms focused on agriculture, newer services are beginning to branch out, some offering job listings or selling tickets to sporting and cultural events over the phone. --M-PESA: Founded in Kenya in 2007, this service allows users to pay for bills or receive their salaries through a mobile phone. In a region—Sub-Saharan Africa—where it’s more common to have a cell phone than a bank account, M-PESA currently has 13 million users. Similar services are already being offered in upwards of 40 countries.

Of course, this kind of mobile service development faces various challenges, a few of which the article highlights—bad regulation, bureaucracy, overreliance on donor money, no path towards growth. But, under the right circumstances, it’s the kind of mobile development that could eventually change lives in poorer countries.

Modeling Bicycle Travel

I’ve been growing increasingly interested in the technology that underlies our transportation systems.  Traditionally, technology in a transportation setting refers mainly to engineering processes, products, materials, and analysis.  Increasingly, however, technology’s ubiquity in our personal lives is enabling cities to improve encouragement and promotion, crowd-sourced auditing of system quality, way-finding, and passive data collection related to our transportation networks. Transportation planning (in the US) largely takes place at the regional scale.  As a simplification, federal money is filtered through “metropolitan planning organizations” (MPOs) who are responsible for projecting trends on a regional scale, setting goals for the local situation, and planning infrastructure projects to meet local demand and goals.  This process largely is facilitated by the occasional MPO-administered travel demand survey, whereby several households are selected at random and asked to report household characteristics and travel behavior. There are several issues with this, not the least of which is the sheer expense of administering such a survey.  But, here I would like to focus on one specific weakness: bicycle data.  These surveys are designed to capture a representative sample of a local population and describe their current travel behaviors.  According to the 2005 American Community Survey, only 0.4% (yes, half of one percent) of Americans use a bicycle to commute to work.  So, when MPOs survey their residents on travel behavior, they often receive only a handful, if any, responses indicating the use of the bicycle for transportation.

The reason that this becomes a weakness in our established regional transportation planning methodology is that with such few responses, there is no statistically robust technique for modeling this population’s behavior – not even enough to guess current travel behavior, let alone how they might travel in 15, 20, or 25 years.

Modeling bicyclist travel behavior is a topic that I am only starting to delve into personally, so forgive any naïveté on my part.  But, I think it is important that people who are interested in mobility and access, in technology, and in “smartening” government processes should know the current limitations and the opportunities that improvements in technology can bring.

The article that inspired me to write today is this one, from the San Francisco Chronicle.  It highlights $33 million of federal transportation funds identified for “experimental projects” in the Bay Area.  One such project includes the installation in San Jose of “eight systems to detect and count bicycles and then install the best technology on two corridors frequented by bike riders.”  This data will help to inform travel models, which will help to inform transportation investments, which hopefully will help to facilitate increased bicycle travel.

In my brief research, I also stumbled across this in-progress project from Portland State University.  It seeks to gather finer-grained data on this topic of bicyclist travel behavior, which in turn could be fed into the models.

Lastly, when you have the time (I’ve still only watched parts of it), see this webinar by Fehr and Peers and the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments titled “GIS-based Bicycle and Pedestrian Demand Forecasting and Traffic Count Programs.”  One striking fact is that, currently, the margin of error in models’ mode choice step (when it decides the transportation mode on which a given trip will be made) is greater than the percentage of commute trips made by biking or walking – making predictions for these modes completely unreliable.  Moreover, unlike for automobiles, bicyclists’ and pedestrians’ trips are almost never assigned to the network, meaning planners have no knowledge of which streets these travelers use now or may use in the future.

The main point to be made is that the bottleneck here is in data collection.  Technological solutions such as mobile phone apps, GPS units, and even cell-phone tracking data can help to jump the hurdle, but a more focused effort in coordinating this data collection needs to be made and standardized in order for it to become truly useful to MPOs and other transportation planners.

-Terra Curtis

Shortlist Copenhagen Future Bike Pilot

On behalf of the City of Copenhagen, we would hereby like to inform you about the 6 Showcases that have been shortlisted in the Future Biking pilot call. To learn more about each Showcase, just follow the respective link.

Billy Bike in Copenhagen Stockholm Sweden
City Supported Community Bicycle Shop Austin USA
eMobility Management Tool Eindhoven The Netherlands
HOME TOWN Athens Greece
Little Bicycle-Sheds - Fahrradhaeuschen Hamburg Germany
Wikiloc Urban Routes Girona Spain

Evaluators at the City of Copenhagen has been impressed with the high level of quality and innovation of the 37 submitted pilots from 17 countries in Europe, Asia and North America and will seek to stay in contact with many of the other inspiring Showcases to see how these might fit into the future strategy of the city and relevant activities. The ideal forum to follow up will naturally be the “Copenhagen | Barcelona | Kaohsiung Summit on Service Innovation in Cities” on November 25th where the relevant decision-makers, led by Health Mayor Ninna Thomsen and Andreas Roehl, director of the bicycle programme will be available to pick up the discussion.

Full details will be published shortly!

Shortlist Copenhagen Future Bike Pilot

On behalf of the City of Copenhagen, we would hereby like to inform you about the 6 Showcases that have been shortlisted in the Future Biking pilot call. To learn more about each Showcase, just follow the respective link.

Billy Bike in Copenhagen Stockholm Sweden
City Supported Community Bicycle Shop Austin USA
eMobility Management Tool Eindhoven The Netherlands
HOME TOWN Athens Greece
Little Bicycle-Sheds - Fahrradhaeuschen Hamburg Germany
Wikiloc Urban Routes Girona Spain

Evaluators at the City of Copenhagen has been impressed with the high level of quality and innovation of the 37 submitted pilots from 17 countries in Europe, Asia and North America and will seek to stay in contact with many of the other inspiring Showcases to see how these might fit into the future strategy of the city and relevant activities. The ideal forum to follow up will naturally be the “Copenhagen | Barcelona | Kaohsiung Summit on Service Innovation in Cities” on November 25th where the relevant decision-makers, led by Health Mayor Ninna Thomsen and Andreas Roehl, director of the bicycle programme will be available to pick up the discussion.

Full details will be published shortly!

We partner with Yasmo Live to offer a radically new networking experience

Yasmo Live announced today that it has entered a partnership with Living Labs Global, a pioneering initiative, led by European Cities, with the objective to promote innovation in services and mobility in cities. [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWykRwGow1k&w=425&h=350]

Yasmo Live will be offering its on-site networking services to maximise the delegates’ networking opportunities before, during and after the ‘Summit on Service Innovation in Cities’, November 24-25 in Copenhagen, where Yasmo Live will be offering its on-site networking services to maximise the delegates’ networking opportunities before, during and after the event.

Yasmo Live will allow users to search through picture-based profiles of fellow attendees directly on their phones, to identify contacts of interest instantly and to arrange on-the-spot meetings.

Sascha Haselmayer, General Director at Living Labs Global commented: ‘Mobility is a paradigm shift in which the user, as a citizen, professional or visitor, is expecting public and private services to be tailored to his needs, delivered on demand, anywhere. Yasmo Live fits perfectly with our mission to materialise the shift that new technologies are bringing and we are proud to be the early adopters of such an innovative networking tool at our conferences.’

Areti Kampyli, CEO of Yasmo Live, said: ‘We are thrilled to be partnering with Living Labs Global, whose objective is to make service innovation happen, as together we can create a springboard for technologies like Yasmo Live to improve our day-to-day lives.’

About Yasmo Live

Yasmo Live, www.yasmolive.com, is a real-time mobile conferencing tool that allows event attendees to see their fellow participants' profiles on their mobile’s screen at conferences supporting its service. Yasmo Live bridges delegates’ digital and real presence, using their mobile phones to enable them to search and display people's profiles that are physically nearby. It serves as the 'missing link' or 'mutual friend' event attendees wished they had, to help them meet the right people. The company is headquartered in London.

Rest your hitchhiker's thumb: Flinc at your service

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YxpC2q33jUk&w=425&h=344] We’ve written a lot lately about how advancements in both technology and legislation are increasing personal mobility (see Ubercab and AB 1871).  We’ve just discovered another example in flinc, an Austria-based company piloting their solution in the German city of Friedrichshafen.  They’ve also been noticed by the European Satellite Navigation Competition of 2010, winning an award in the location-based services category. Flinc integrates automobile navigation systems with mobile phones, and allows a driver traveling to a specific destination to connect, in real time, with a “hitchhiker” along their route, going the same way.  It saves both parties money and, by encouraging carpooling, saves emissions and helps the environment.

If you’re interested in seeing flinc piloted in your region, let your voice be heard!  They’re basing development on citizen input.  Check out the map feature on their website to see who’s leading in votes.  Posting 17 votes so far, Copenhagen hopes to see flinc at Living Lab’s Summit on Service Innovation in November.

-Terra Curtis

Rest your hitchhiker's thumb: Flinc at your service

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YxpC2q33jUk&w=425&h=344] We’ve written a lot lately about how advancements in both technology and legislation are increasing personal mobility (see Ubercab and AB 1871).  We’ve just discovered another example in flinc, an Austria-based company piloting their solution in the German city of Friedrichshafen.  They’ve also been noticed by the European Satellite Navigation Competition of 2010, winning an award in the location-based services category. Flinc integrates automobile navigation systems with mobile phones, and allows a driver traveling to a specific destination to connect, in real time, with a “hitchhiker” along their route, going the same way.  It saves both parties money and, by encouraging carpooling, saves emissions and helps the environment.

If you’re interested in seeing flinc piloted in your region, let your voice be heard!  They’re basing development on citizen input.  Check out the map feature on their website to see who’s leading in votes.  Posting 17 votes so far, Copenhagen hopes to see flinc at Living Lab’s Summit on Service Innovation in November.

-Terra Curtis