data management

Have a real-time information product for mobile devices? Fukuoka is willing to try it in their city!

The japanese city of Fukuoka is seeking products/solutions to deliver real-time bus, destination and tourist information to visitors in an easily accessible way on smartphones, screens and mobile devices. The city invites companies worldwide to submit their solutions before 17th February to the Living Labs Global Award 2012.

Submissions to the Award are free of charge and the winner of the Fukuoka category will be invited to pilot the solution in the city, with full support from local stakeholders to evaluate the solution before a full-scale roll-out.

In last year's edition, Worldsensing for example managed to see a pilot implementation of its FastPrk Technology to monitor parking within 6 months of winning the Living Labs Global Award.

For the 2012 edition, with the aim of improving mobility in Fukuoka, we are seeking a solution that provides bus and city information to non-daily users using a mobile platform: Mobile Bus Information System, or MBIS for short. The MBIS should include information on current city traffic conditions, bus schedules, bus transfers, the time needed to reach any destination, tourist information, city information, and so on (more information here).

How to submit:

Entries can be submitted online on www.llga.org until 17th February.

International juries will evaluate the entries and provide a shortlist of the top 100 showcases on 5th March. Winners will be announced on 2nd May 2012 at the Award Ceremony during the networking Rio Summit on Service Innovation in Cities, for which all participants are invited.

About the Living Labs Global Award 2012:

Living Labs Global, a non-profit association promoting innovative solutions in cities around the world, is organising the 2012 edition of the Living Labs Global Award in cooperation with the cities of Barcelona, Birmingham, Caceres, Cape Town, Coventry, Derry~Londonderry, Eindhoven, Fukuoka, Glasgow, Guadalajara, Hamburg, Lagos, Lavasa, Kristiansand, Mexico City, Rio de Janeiro, Rome-Lazio, San Francisco, Sant Cugat, Santiago de Chile and Terrassa.

Together with these 21 cities, the Living Labs Global Award 2012 aims to provide a market opportunity to innovative solutions with the aim of helping over 110 million citizens in the Americas, Africa, Asia and Europe.

For more information:

Email: media@livinglabs-global.com

Tel.: +34 93 1855110

www.llga.org Twitter: @LivingLabsAward Facebook: www.facebook.com/llga2012

Birmingham Seeks Food Waste Management solutions - call for submissions

The city of Birmingham (UK) is investing to turn food waste into energy and invites companies worldwide to submit their waste management solutions before 17th February to the Living Labs Global Award 2012.

Submissions to the Award are free of charge and the winner of the Birmingham category will be invited to pilot the solution in the city, with full support from local stakeholders to evaluate the solution before a full-scale roll-out.

In last year's edition, Bitcarrier for example managed to see a pilot implementation of its CitySolver Technology to monitor traffic within 3 months of winning the Living Labs Global Award, and a public procurement within just 6 months of winning the Award.

For this year's award, Birmingham is seeking solutions to better understand and capture the waste streams generated throughout the city, potentially utilising a data management system to identify its trends and impact in order to efficiently process the waste and convert it into a sustainable energy source (more information here).

How to submit:

Entries can be submitted online on www.llga.org until 17th February.

International juries will evaluate the entries and provide a shortlist of the top 100 showcases on 5th March. Winners will be announced on 2nd May 2012 at the Award Ceremony during the networking Rio Summit on Service Innovation in Cities, for which all participants are invited.

About the Living Labs Global Award 2012:

Living Labs Global, a non-profit association promoting innovative solutions in cities around the world, is organising the 2012 edition of the Living Labs Global Award in cooperation with the cities of Barcelona, Birmingham, Caceres, Cape Town, Coventry, Derry~Londonderry, Eindhoven, Fukuoka, Glasgow, Guadalajara, Hamburg, Lagos, Lavasa, Kristiansand, Mexico City, Rio de Janeiro, Rome-Lazio, San Francisco, Sant Cugat, Santiago de Chile and Terrassa.

Together with these 21 cities, the Living Labs Global Award 2012 aims to provide a market opportunity to innovative solutions with the aim of helping over 110 million citizens in the Americas, Africa, Asia and Europe.

For more information:

Email: m.carvalho@livinglabs-global.com 

Tel.: +34 93 1855110

www.llga.org Twitter: @LivingLabsAward Facebook: www.facebook.com/llga2012

Things that would make transportation planners’ jobs easier

I’m spending the summer working for a large municipal transportation agency, the city agency that manages public transit, parking, bicycling, walking, and taxis.  Grad school is enlightening, but can be quite removed from the day-to-day work of transportation planners.  So, throughout this experience, I’m trying to gain insight into what it’s like “in the real world” of planning. Given the focus of this blog on digital services and tech solutions, I wanted to posit a few things that would be nice-to-haves given the work I’ve been a part of so far this summer.

  1. Automated Speed / Count Collection While this is technologically possible already, purchasing and installing automatic speed detectors and automobile / bicycle counting devices is expensive and time-intensive enough to make it scarce within the city.  For pedestrians, it’s not even technologically possible yet that I know of.  It’s been incredible to see just how much information about our City goes unknown.  Even if we had these data, they are point-specific, and therefore only provide best-guesses about how traffic, bicycles, and pedestrian move dynamically throughout the city’s urban fabric. 
  2. Location-Based File Storage Because so much of what we do in transportation planning is location-specific, why not organize our internal file structure on a map-based user interface (UI) rather than the traditional file tree?  This would enable people working on different projects but at the same or similar locations to collaborate more easily.  It would raise awareness about simultaneous projects.  It could allow for the consideration of a broader set of existing conditions data for a particular location because the planner would, in one click, know all of the available information for that location.  
  3. Location-Based Data Merge This might be provided as a consequence of the UI developed above.  What I imagine is a relational database that links files that deal with overlapping physical locations.  This database could be queried using SQL to produce quick, comprehensive reports for particular attributes of a location. 
  4. Open and Visualized Crash Data Bicycle and pedestrian planners examine crash data in great detail in order to recommend and implement capital improvements for safety.  While fairly detailed public records exist, in its current format it is often difficult to visualize in the physical setting and as such, hard to understand trends over time and appropriate solutions to the safety issues.

I’m sure I will have more nice-to-haves as the summer goes along.  Is there anything that you would add to this list?  Are any of these solutions already in existence?  Please share your experiences.

- Terra Curtis