Sustainability

Citymart.com partners with UN Global Compact Cities Programme

Today Citymart.com, the global marketplace for cities connecting more than 50 global cities with more than 1,000 providers of solutions to improve lives announces a landmark partnership with the UN Global Compact Cities Programme. As part of the agreement, Citymart.com has implemented the Cities Programme's 4 dimensions of sustainability used by cities such as Melbourne or São Paulo to carry out their sustainability assessments.

The UN Global Compact Cities Programme is dedicated to the promotion and adoption of the Global Compact’s ten principles by cities, and provides a framework for translating the principles into day-to-day urban governance and management.

Citymart.com will be the first global marketplace and solution resource to adopt the 4 dimensions of impact reporting in partnership with UN Global Compact Cities Programme:

- Impact on Ecology - Impact on Economy - Impact on Culture - Impact on Politics

 

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Already today, this model has been implemented in the Citymart.com Showcase as well as in the evaluation model used by the experts appointed in the jury process of LLGA|Cities Pilot the Future, underwritten by 21 global cities such as Barcelona, London, Paris, Mexico City, Lavasa, Lagos and Cape Town.

Citymart.com thereby provides solution providers guidance in reporting the impact of technologies and other innovations in line with the objectives identified in the UN Global Compact process.

21 world cities reveal the winning solutions to improve lives of 110 million citizens

Twenty-one cities from Asia, Africa, Europe, North and Latin America have announced the winners of the Living Labs Global Award 2012 (LLGA 2012) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Award presented major urban challenges faced by cities such as Barcelona, San Francisco, Cape Town, Mexico City, Birmingham, Rio de Janeiro or Lagos, to which 555 companies from 50 countries responded by presenting their innovative solutions. Cities spend EUR 3.5 Trillion annually in public procurement, and technologies promise major efficiency, accessibility and service quality gains.

During the first world meeting in Latin America on the smart use of technologies and services, public leaders from 21 global cities have revealed the winning innovative solutions that best meet strategic challenges like Affordable Housing Units for Lagos (Nigeria), Data to Help Fight Obesity in Eindhoven (The Netherlands), Changing Private Car Use in Lavasa (India), Wireless Control of Urban Systems in San Francisco (USA), a Knowledge Square to enhance digital inclusion in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), Participation in Service Design and Delivery in Sant Cugat (Spain), Digital Public Transport in Mexico City (Mexico) and Engaging Visitors Experience in Barcelona (Spain). Winning solutions of the LLGA 2012 will now be piloted in the 21 participating cities over the next 12 months, to evaluate their impact to meet the pressing challenges.

 The winning solutions are:

 City of Barcelona (Spain): Contactless tags to bridge real and physical worlds, by Connecthings

City of Birmingham (UK): Composting on-site in Green Communities, by Susteco AB

City of Cáceres (Spain): Sustainable Cities. Motion is Energy, by OTEM2000 - Green Solutions & Management S.L.

City of Cape Town (South Africa):  Cape GeniUS!, by SCY

City of Coventry (UK): HLG SYSTEM, by GLASS COVER Europe S.L.

City of Derry~Londonderry (UK): Contactless tags to bridge real and physical worlds, by Connecthings

City of Eindhoven (The Netherlands): The App that gets teenagers moving, by GGD Brabant-Zuidoost

City of Fukuoka (Japan): Smart PathFinder, by Where 2 Get It, Inc.

City of Glasgow (UK): SmartCity Málaga, by Endesa

City of Guadalajara (Mexico): Guadalajara: Keeping Road Surfaces in Top Condition, by Falcon Road Maintenance Equipment

City of Hamburg (Germany): Contactless tags to bridge real and physical worlds, by Connecthings

City of Kristiansand (Norway): City Direct, by Innovation Center Iceland

City of Lagos (Nigeria): Lagos state Housing Solution, by TEMPOHOUSING NIGERIA LIMITED

City of Lavasa (India): SKYBUS, by Skybus

Mexico City (Mexico): Modern Urban Transport Information, by Clever Devices

City of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil): Contactless tags to bridge real and physical worlds, by Connecthings

Rome - Lazio Region (Italy): Get on board and play with bUS, by Placemaking srl

City of San Francisco (USA): From Street Lighting Management to Advanced Smart City Services, by Paradox Engineering

City of Sant Cugat (Spain): MindMixer, by MindMixer.com

City of Santiago de Chile (Chile): SFpark - A New way of managing parking, by San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency

City of Terrassa (Spain): CityWalking, by UPC BarcelonaTech

In a unique global effort, 555 technology solutions from about 50 countries submitted to the Living Labs Global Award 2012 in February, while 109 were shortlisted in March. Winners have been selected after an international two-round jury process involving 147 jurors, under the auspices of Living Labs Global, a non-profit association based in Copenhagen and Barcelona working with 50 cities and 1,000 companies around the world to promote service innovation in cities. The Living Labs Global Award is a unique global process providing full accountability in the evaluation through independent experts. The LLGA 2012 was promoted by 21 global cities in partnership with Living Labs Global, Citymart.com, Oracle and The Climate Group.

The LLGA 2012 Ceremony of 2 May was attended by 200 participants from 22 countries in Rio de Janeiro as part of the Rio Summit on Service Innovation in Cities.

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 “Today we have witnessed a major commitment towards meeting some of the world’s pressing urban challenges, with the goal of improving the lives of more than 50% of the world’s population by using clean technologies, smart services and better accessibility. The winners will now have the opportunity to implement their solutions in real-life, and work together with stakeholders in the 21 partner cities to prove their impact,” said Sascha Haselmayer, Co-Founder of Living Labs Global.

 The Living Labs Global Award 2012 has been an important event for the City of Rio de Janeiro, which will soon host the Football World Cup and the Olympic Games. We thrive upon knowledge and innovation and this Summit exchanges experience and cutting-edge solutions. It has been a very successful event. Through the Living Labs Global Award 2012 we received 109 solutions that will help us to develop our Knowledge Square, which is being implemented in 6 areas of the city and aims to enhance digital inclusion across Rio de Janeiro,” said Franklin Coelho, Secretary of Science and Technology of the City of Rio de Janeiro, host city and partner of the LLGA 2012.

The cities will be considered at the cutting edge of innovation and progress, as contactless technologies and associated mobile services are about to revolutionize mobile usages. They will also enjoy a new two-channel interactive communication tool, visible and accessible to everyone which is particularly important for an emerging global city. Connecthings will be glad to benefit from such prestigious international references and to demonstrate that its solutions are flexible and adaptable to cities’ diverse challenges,” said Damaris Homo, Business Development Manager at Connecthings, winner of four LLGA 2012, including the categories of Rio de Janeiro and Barcelona.

With initiatives like the Living Labs Global Award 2012 we are transforming Barcelona into a platform for innovation. We would like to see successful projects in the city being replicated in others, such as Rio de Janeiro or Paris, to name a few. The city of Rio as the host of the next Football World Cup and the Olympic Games must also think about their legacy and how the infrastructure will bring benefits to its citizens in the future, said Josep M. Piqué, Strategic Sectors Director, 22@ Barcelona, partner city of the LLGA 2012.

“Over 50% of the world population lives in cities and only by having them on our side will we win the battle against pollution and build a better world. We have to disseminate the Clean Revolution to city leaders, said Molly Webb, Head of Smart Technologies, The Climate Group, partner of the LLGA 2012.

On the second day of the meeting, May 3, during the Rio Summit on Service Innovation in Cities, 200 delegates from 22 countries, including public leaders from 30 international cities and pioneering entrepreneurs driving social and technological innovation are engaging in matchmaking activities to foster partnerships and dialogues on the investment priorities of participating cities: Urban Systems & Services, Health & Wellbeing, Open Government & Accessibility, Clean and Green Cities, Tourism & Mobility.

On May 4, delegates join LLGA 2012 local immersion programme to experience some of the ground-breaking projects, such as the Change through Digital Inclusion (CDI) programme in the favelas of Rio de Janeiro, now adopted by 717 communities in 14 countries.

About Citymart.com

Citymart.coml is a non-profit association based in Copenhagen (Denmark) and Barcelona (Spain), working with 50 cities and 1,000 companies and research centres in Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas with a mission to open the market for service innovation in cities and overcoming key technology, organisation and trade barriers. The Living Labs Global Award is an annual process over 8 months in which cities present their challenges and provide guidance to the business and technology community on future investment plans and needs. Solution providers respond by submitting existing technologies as entries for evaluation by an international jury.

Previous LLGA winners

Some of the winners of LLGA since 2010 include SOCRATA, whose solution has been implemented by San Francisco to power the city’s new cloud-based Open Data site, URBIOTICA’s intelligent waste management sensors for recycling containers and WORRLDSENSING’s cutting-edge urban smart parking solution.

Facts:

More than 557,000 local governments provide services to more than 50% of the world’s population with an annual spending of 3.5 Trillion Euros per year. New technologies can radically improve transport and mobility, urban systems and services, open government, health and wellbeing and other key areas of urban life.

More information on www.llga.org

Follow us on Twitter (@LLGACities), Facebook.com/citymartcom and Linkedin

Keeping Road Surfaces in top condition - Guadalajara wants your solutions!

Guadalajara (Mexico) is investing to secure the sustainability and longevity of its road surfaces and invites companies worldwide to submit their solutions before 17th February to the Living Labs Global Award 2012.

Submissions are free of charge and the winner of the Guadalajara category will be invited to pilot its solutions in this city with full support from local stakeholders to evaluate the solution before a full-scale roll-out.

In last year’s edition, Urbiotica, for example managed to see a pilot implementation of its Smart Waste Sensors in Barcelona after winning the Living Labs Global Award 2010.

Guadalajara is seeking new solutions to improve management and financing of materials and labor to keep the streets and avenues of the city in best possible conditions for the circulation of over 1.5 million private, public and commercial vehicles. The city also aims to create a collaborative environment between suppliers, citizens and government to make the pavement challenge part of the culture of the city as well as of the day-to-day lives of its citizens (more information here).

How to submit:

Entries can be submitted online until 17th February.

International juries will evaluate the entries and provide a shortlist of the top 100 showcases on 5th March. Winners will be announced on 2nd May 2012 at the Award Ceremony during the networking Rio Summit on Service Innovation in Cities, for which all participants are invited.

 

About the Living Labs Global Award 2012:

Living Labs Global, a non-profit association promoting innovative solutions in cities around the world, is organising the 2012 edition of the Living Labs Global Award in cooperation with the cities of Barcelona, Birmingham, Caceres, Cape Town, Coventry, Derry~Londonderry, Eindhoven, Fukuoka, Glasgow, Guadalajara, Hamburg, Lagos, Lavasa, Kristiansand, Mexico City, Rio de Janeiro, Rome-Lazio, San Francisco, Sant Cugat, Santiago de Chile and Terrassa.

Together with these 21 cities, the Living Labs Global Award 2012 aims to provide a market opportunity to innovative solutions with the aim of helping over 110 million citizens in the Americas, Africa, Asia and Europe.

 

For more information please contact Living Labs Global office in Spain:

Email: media@livinglabs-global.com / Tel.: 0034 93 1855110

www.llga.org Twitter: @LivingLabsAward Facebook: www.facebook.com/llga2012

Do you have a Solution for the Maintenance of Urban Surfaces? Coventry wants to try it!

The city of Coventry (UK) is investing to secure the sustainability and longevity of its urban surfaces in key areas of the city and invites companies worldwide to submit their solutions before 17th February to the Living Labs Global Award 2012.

Submissions are free of charge and the winner of the Coventry category will be invited to pilot its solution in this city with full support from local stakeholders to evaluate the solution before a full-scale roll-out.

In last year’s edition, Worldsensing for example managed to see a pilot implementation of its FastPrk Technology to monitor parking within 6 months of winning the Living Labs Global Award.

Coventry is looking for a sustainable, low maintenance and innovative approach to protecting, cleaning and maintaining two of the sites that are at the heart of the city’s recent public realm improvements.  The city wants to ensure a good quality environment is maintained for future generations (more information here).

 

How to submit:

Entries can be submitted online until 17th February 2012.

International juries will evaluate the entries and provide a shortlist of the top 100 showcases on 5th March. Winners will be announced on 2nd May 2012 at the Award Ceremony during the networking Rio Summit on Service Innovation in Cities, for which all participants are invited.

 

About the Living Labs Global Award 2012:

Living Labs Global, a non-profit association promoting innovative solutions in cities around the world, is organising the 2012 edition of the Living Labs Global Award in cooperation with the cities of Barcelona, Birmingham, Caceres, Cape Town, Coventry, Derry~Londonderry, Eindhoven, Fukuoka, Glasgow, Guadalajara, Hamburg, Lagos, Lavasa, Kristiansand, Mexico City, Rio de Janeiro, Rome-Lazio, San Francisco, Sant Cugat, Santiago de Chile and Terrassa.

Together with these 21 cities, the Living Labs Global Award 2012 aims to provide a market opportunity to innovative solutions with the aim of helping over 110 million citizens in the Americas, Africa, Asia and Europe.

 

For more information please contact Living Labs Global office in Spain:

Email: media@livinglabs-global.com / Tel.: 0034 93 1855110

www.llga.org Twitter: @LivingLabsAward Facebook: www.facebook.com/llga2012

Could it be easier to live without a car than with?

If you’re living car-free, you probably already know the answer to that question. If you live in one of the select cities where development is dense, urban spaces are interesting and inviting, and streets are places rather than empty spaces, then your answer is almost certainly a resounding ‘yes.’

Quebec City

A friend passed along this series of posts about “traditional cities” versus “hypertrophic cities,” and the implications each have for a car-free (and, he argues, a generally pleasant) lifestyle. He further classifies hypertrophic cities into 19th and 20th Century versions – 19th Century hypertrophic cities grew as a result of the Industrial Revolution, when technology advanced quickly but travel speeds were not at all near what we have today. Twentieth Century hypertrophic cities grew at an alarmingly fast rate, with the provision of interstate highways, fast and comfortable cars, cheap fuel, and a vision of The Future City that prioritized the machine elements of a city rather than human ones. Traditional cities (like Venice, Tallin, older parts of Kyoto) have a couple key characteristics; the most revealing according to Nathan Lewis are narrow streets. These have two effects: they make driving difficult and they make walking appealing. Today, in our 20th Century hypertrophic cities, we are trying to grapple with the discrepancy between these inviting places and the hostile environments created through prioritizing non-human elements.

Perhaps the metric of success we should use is whether or not it becomes easier, after retrofitting and changing future growth scenarios, to live in our cities without a car than with. Do citizens have more access to jobs, to amenities, to health care, to activities by walking, biking, or taking mass transit than by driving? Several strategies are being used to achieve this (e.g. limiting parking, pricing driving in downtowns). Do you think our cities are retrofit-able? In what other ways can we conceive of these “narrow streets?”

-          Terra Curtis 

Living Labs Global cities sign to share technologies and policies in Tainan

At The Global Smart City Summit in Tainan this week, our partner cities Tainan, Eindhoven and Lavasa together with the cities of Dubuque (US), Kortrijk (BE) and Helsingborg (SE) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding to collaborate on Smart City developments and knowledge exchange in the coming years.

Tainan's Mayor Ching-te Lai concluded yesterday's lively exchange with about 250 participants at which six cities shared their visions, projects at which the issues of citizen participation, environmental sustainability, inter-governmental collaboration and new procurement practices were central issues.

One clear statement resonated across all cities: That Smart Cities are not a technology product, but the intelligent application of government policies, public-private-partnerships and a clear focus on and inclusion of citizens. Hence, the participating mayors declared their intention to 're-conquer' the smart city concept from what has become a one-sided technology perspective.

Mega-city, Mega-challenge

Lagos, one of the world’s 10 most populated cities and one of the top 3 fastest growing, faces a great challenge in providing housing for all its residents at prices they can afford. In the United States, homeownership is a basic component of the American Dream. Everyone has a right to shelter, and most everyone wants to own it. In Europe, housing policy reflects the same right to shelter, but cultural norms don’t require ownership of one’s home. Now, as developing countries grow and continue to urbanize at unprecedented rates, cities like Lagos have to find ways to provide this basic human right as well. Here, there is both a challenge and an opportunity – to learn from those mistakes made by industrialized countries.

It is encouraging to see that Lagos has recognized this opportunity – they are looking for solutions to their 5 million unit gap in housing supply not only through increasing units, but by treating those units as building blocks in its city service system. They envision housing as a dissemination point for energy, water, health, security, mobility, business services, and education. Together, this network can reduce costs to individuals and society through cross-subsidization of services.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i4TvesXV_Yg&w=440&h=253] Sustainable, affordable, and innovative housing solutions on the scale needed in Lagos remain elusive. Nonetheless, a couple of small-scale innovative housing examples may be of interest. Another article from Japan for Sustainability notes a new “hybrid house” design, which will be powered with three power systems: photovoltaics, fuel cells, and secondary batteries. The designers estimate that homeowners could have zero utilities costs under this system, which creates enough power for such appliances as LCD televisions, refrigerators, and lighting – systems that could be pooled in Lagos’ case to achieve further economies of scale.

decathlon

A second project is the result of a “solar decathlon” – a US Department of Energy-sponsored event to gather ideas from students across the world. While most of the prototype homes portray designs applicable in the US or developed country context, seeing them all together on the National Mall (see photo above) allows one to envision the great potential for dense, sustainable, solar-powered homes. Perhaps in future competitions, the judges could add “fits in the context of a dense, rapidly urbanizing city” to its criteria. For, due to these cities’ stage of development, these locations offer opportunities for the greatest environmental and sustainability gains.

-          Terra Curtis

Mega-city, Mega-challenge

Lagos, one of the world’s 10 most populated cities and one of the top 3 fastest growing, faces a great challenge in providing housing for all its residents at prices they can afford. In the United States, homeownership is a basic component of the American Dream. Everyone has a right to shelter, and most everyone wants to own it. In Europe, housing policy reflects the same right to shelter, but cultural norms don’t require ownership of one’s home. Now, as developing countries grow and continue to urbanize at unprecedented rates, cities like Lagos have to find ways to provide this basic human right as well. Here, there is both a challenge and an opportunity – to learn from those mistakes made by industrialized countries.

It is encouraging to see that Lagos has recognized this opportunity – they are looking for solutions to their 5 million unit gap in housing supply not only through increasing units, but by treating those units as building blocks in its city service system. They envision housing as a dissemination point for energy, water, health, security, mobility, business services, and education. Together, this network can reduce costs to individuals and society through cross-subsidization of services.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i4TvesXV_Yg&w=440&h=253] Sustainable, affordable, and innovative housing solutions on the scale needed in Lagos remain elusive. Nonetheless, a couple of small-scale innovative housing examples may be of interest. Another article from Japan for Sustainability notes a new “hybrid house” design, which will be powered with three power systems: photovoltaics, fuel cells, and secondary batteries. The designers estimate that homeowners could have zero utilities costs under this system, which creates enough power for such appliances as LCD televisions, refrigerators, and lighting – systems that could be pooled in Lagos’ case to achieve further economies of scale.

decathlon

A second project is the result of a “solar decathlon” – a US Department of Energy-sponsored event to gather ideas from students across the world. While most of the prototype homes portray designs applicable in the US or developed country context, seeing them all together on the National Mall (see photo above) allows one to envision the great potential for dense, sustainable, solar-powered homes. Perhaps in future competitions, the judges could add “fits in the context of a dense, rapidly urbanizing city” to its criteria. For, due to these cities’ stage of development, these locations offer opportunities for the greatest environmental and sustainability gains.

-          Terra Curtis

Sustenergy - Sustainable Energy

food You know that energy you get from drinking a fresh cup of coffee? That energy is unsustainable.  Energy from a good night’s sleep, a healthy diet, and exercise stays with you throughout the day and throughout your life. A number of our awards cities this round are seeking solutions related to energy, and each of them is focused on finding more sustainable ways of producing it.

Birmingham, in the UK, wants a solution to transform its many tonnes of food waste into an energy source for businesses and residents. The city of Caceres, in Spain, identified municipal sports facilities as its potential source of sustainable energy. Kinetic energy could be captured to power the facility and perhaps streetlights or other municipal infrastructure.

Japan for Sustainability, a Japanese non-profit we’ve mentioned on this blog before, has been reporting several initiatives in their country related to sustainable energy that are worthwhile to report.

  • Solar-powered bus shelters: these photo-voltaic-equipped bus shelters protect waiting passengers from sun and rain, collect energy to light the bus stop at night, and have the ability to utilize any excess energy for powering nearby facilities, supplementing power during shortages like emergencies, or selling excess to power companies.  Sustainable solution indeed!
  • Citizen-funded solar generation project: property owners in Higashiomi, Japan can install subsidized solar panels on their roof, feed the power into a citywide network, and, as investors, receive dividends from the proceeds in the form of coupons to local establishments. It a sustainable solution for the economy and the environment.
  • Dynamic electricity pricing: Kitakyushu will pilot dynamic pricing of electricity based on season and time of day.  Ten percent of energy will come from wind and solar, while the remaining comes from a natural gas cogeneration plant.

What if some of the ideas coming from Japanese projects could be combined with Birmingham and Caceres’ request for proposals? For instance, what if households and businesses could “invest in” the local power grid by collecting and donating food waste? They could be incentivized in a way similar to the citizen-funded solar project in Japan. Or, what if the municipal sports facilities excess energy could be used to power not bus shelters, but electric buses or electric bicycles – sustainable forms of transport? Keep an eye on the submissions; this will be an interesting set for sure.

-          Terra Curtis

Sustenergy - Sustainable Energy

food You know that energy you get from drinking a fresh cup of coffee? That energy is unsustainable.  Energy from a good night’s sleep, a healthy diet, and exercise stays with you throughout the day and throughout your life. A number of our awards cities this round are seeking solutions related to energy, and each of them is focused on finding more sustainable ways of producing it.

Birmingham, in the UK, wants a solution to transform its many tonnes of food waste into an energy source for businesses and residents. The city of Caceres, in Spain, identified municipal sports facilities as its potential source of sustainable energy. Kinetic energy could be captured to power the facility and perhaps streetlights or other municipal infrastructure.

Japan for Sustainability, a Japanese non-profit we’ve mentioned on this blog before, has been reporting several initiatives in their country related to sustainable energy that are worthwhile to report.

  • Solar-powered bus shelters: these photo-voltaic-equipped bus shelters protect waiting passengers from sun and rain, collect energy to light the bus stop at night, and have the ability to utilize any excess energy for powering nearby facilities, supplementing power during shortages like emergencies, or selling excess to power companies.  Sustainable solution indeed!
  • Citizen-funded solar generation project: property owners in Higashiomi, Japan can install subsidized solar panels on their roof, feed the power into a citywide network, and, as investors, receive dividends from the proceeds in the form of coupons to local establishments. It a sustainable solution for the economy and the environment.
  • Dynamic electricity pricing: Kitakyushu will pilot dynamic pricing of electricity based on season and time of day.  Ten percent of energy will come from wind and solar, while the remaining comes from a natural gas cogeneration plant.

What if some of the ideas coming from Japanese projects could be combined with Birmingham and Caceres’ request for proposals? For instance, what if households and businesses could “invest in” the local power grid by collecting and donating food waste? They could be incentivized in a way similar to the citizen-funded solar project in Japan. Or, what if the municipal sports facilities excess energy could be used to power not bus shelters, but electric buses or electric bicycles – sustainable forms of transport? Keep an eye on the submissions; this will be an interesting set for sure.

-          Terra Curtis

San Francisco's Tall Order

Market StreetNow you’ve seen the official announcement for Living Labs Global’s Award for 2012.  Twenty cities will pick twenty solutions to pilot locally in a scheme to benefit both cities and companies.  Broadly speaking, the cities we’ve partnered with in this award round are concerned with six large topics: energy, health, housing, sustainability, tourism, and transportation.

While there are reasons to be cautious about public-private partnerships like those we promote through the award, the overwhelming sentiment today is that these sorts of relationships are fundamental to the success of innovation in cities.  In a recent interview, San Francisco mayoral candidate Phil Ting said,

"Using Web 2.0 tools, Sunshine (Ordinance information) requests and a little old-fashioned incentive-based marketing, we were able to do in less than two months and for just $1,000 what it would have taken City Hall two years and millions of dollars to accomplish."

In today’s economic environment, these relationships are crucial.  San Francisco is one of our partner cities this round; they are looking for new solutions to use its street light poles for integrated, expandable wireless monitoring and controls to consolidate the city’s wireless systems.  This comes on the heels of an announcement that the city will provide free wifi along the Market Street corridor, an area of the city that has received a lot of attention lately as the focus of an economic stimulation and transportation improvement project.

The solution San Francisco seeks, though, goes beyond leveraging street poles as wifi infrastructure.  They want a comprehensive solution to the provision of many urban services – street light control, electric vehicle charging, parking monitoring, and the promotion of public safety and energy efficiency – by leveraging the public infrastructure already in place.

Lessons could be taken from Barcelona’s 22@Urban Lab project, which has implemented smart street lights, utility monitoring, and several other sustainability-focused projects.  No one solution has yet been comprehensive, though.

Further, while a recent student suggests more than 2/3rds of electric vehicle charging equipment will be sold and used by individual households, citizens of San Francisco (and other large cities) face the challenge of access to charging stations at home.  In California, Assembly Bill 631 was recently passed, which vows to “provide market certainty” for the infrastructure that is needed to support a consumer fleet of electric vehicles.  Therefore, the company to pilot a solution here could open many opportunities for themselves throughout the state.

-          Terra Curtis

Our new book is online: Navigate Change - How new approaches to public procurement will create new markets

We have now made the electronic version of our new guidebook for SMEs on new approaches to public procurement available for viewing and download. Printed copies are available in limited number, and the guidebook should soon be available in other languages. This book was published by ACC1Ó, the Catalan Competitiveness Agency as part of the European EuroPROC consortium. Base Design has done a beatuful job in illustrating the complex themes and ideas. The book contains interviews with leading decision makers from policy, business and research on the realities and opportunities in changing procurement practices. Further, it contains 18 case studies covering smaller companies experience in exporting under new procurement regimes to global markets.

Navigate Change: How new approaches to public procurement will create new marketshttp://www.scribd.com/embeds/56449250/content?start_page=1&view_mode=list&access_key=key-2btqrcebrt0lvw9xi3np(function() { var scribd = document.createElement("script"); scribd.type = "text/javascript"; scribd.async = true; scribd.src = "http://www.scribd.com/javascripts/embed_code/inject.js"; var s = document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(scribd, s); })();

Our new book is online: Navigate Change - How new approaches to public procurement will create new markets

We have now made the electronic version of our new guidebook for SMEs on new approaches to public procurement available for viewing and download. Printed copies are available in limited number, and the guidebook should soon be available in other languages. This book was published by ACC1Ó, the Catalan Competitiveness Agency as part of the European EuroPROC consortium. Base Design has done a beatuful job in illustrating the complex themes and ideas. The book contains interviews with leading decision makers from policy, business and research on the realities and opportunities in changing procurement practices. Further, it contains 18 case studies covering smaller companies experience in exporting under new procurement regimes to global markets.

Navigate Change: How new approaches to public procurement will create new marketshttp://www.scribd.com/embeds/56449250/content?start_page=1&view_mode=list&access_key=key-2btqrcebrt0lvw9xi3np(function() { var scribd = document.createElement("script"); scribd.type = "text/javascript"; scribd.async = true; scribd.src = "http://www.scribd.com/javascripts/embed_code/inject.js"; var s = document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(scribd, s); })();

Eight Cities Announce Winners to Solve Major Urban Challenges at LLGA2011

The cities of Barcelona, Cape Town, Eindhoven, Lagos, San Francisco, Sant Cugat, Stockholm and Taipei announce the winners of the Living Labs Global Award 2011.

The Award presented the major challenges faced by these cities in the coming years, to which 245 companies from 30 countries responded by presenting their solutions. With rapidly growing populations, budget pressures due to the financial crisis and increasing international competition for investment, talent and tourists cities are looking for innovative approaches to remain competitive. Cities represent a major, yet complex market, spending an annual EUR 3.5 trillion in public procurement alone

The cities of Barcelona, Cape Town, Eindhoven, Lagos, San Francisco, Sant Cugat, Stockholm and Taipei have announced eight winning solutions that were selected by 45 international users out of 245 submissions from 30 countries. Winning solutions will now be piloted in the participating cities, to evaluate their impact to meet the challenges.

In a unique global effort, eight cities joined forces with Living Labs Global to present their pressing challenges to the global business and technology community.

Challenges put forward by cities include the need to provide more efficient and sustainable urban services such as lighting using latest LED technologies; to rethink city services in the light of open data and apps developed by interest groups; to overcome media piracy undermining native film industries through digital distribution systems; or the need to provide financing and support to social entrepreneurs in African cities. The winning solutions are:

City of Barcelona: Citysolver, by Bitcarrier

City of Cape Town:  Venture Capital Cultivator Fund, by PoweredbyVC

City of Eindhoven: Integral Solution for Urban Infrastructures (SIIUR), by bdigital

City of Lagos: Eggup | Sell your films while preventing piracy, by Eggup.com

City of San Francisco: Open Data as a Platform for Citizen Service Delivery, by Socrata Inc.

City of Sant Cugat: Smart Parking for Smart Urban Living, by Worldsensing

City of Stockholm: Spotscout, by Spotscout Inc.

City of Taipei: A+ Care: Smart Autonomous TeleHealth Care Service, by Netown

Winners were announced after an international two-round jury process under auspices of Living Labs Global, a non-profit association based in Copenhagen working with 40 cities and 450 companies around the world to promote service innovation in cities.

The Award Ceremony was attended by 200 participants from 20 countries in Stockholm as part of the Stockholm Summit for Service Innovation in Cities.

The Living Labs Global Award 2011 is a unique global process providing full accountability in the evaluation through independent experts. The Award was carried out in partnership with Oracle Corporation, Farglory and supporting organisations from around the world.

About the Living Labs Global Award

Living Labs Global is a non-profit association based in Copenhagen (Denmark), working with 40 cities and 450 companies and research centres in Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas with a mission to open the market for service innovation in cities and overcoming key technology, organisation and trade barriers.

The Living Labs Global Award is an annual process over 8 months in which cities present their challenges and provide guidance to the business and technology community on future investment plans and needs. Solution providers respond by submitting existing technologies as entries for evaluation by an international jury.

Follow results and the upcoming Living Labs Global Award 2012 on Twitter. Facts: More than 557,000 local governments provide services to more than 50% of the world’s population with an annual spending of 3.5 Trillion Euros per year. New technologies can radically improve transport and mobility systems, access to finance, media distribution, social services and other key areas of urban life.

Eight Cities Announce Winners to Solve Major Urban Challenges at LLGA2011

The cities of Barcelona, Cape Town, Eindhoven, Lagos, San Francisco, Sant Cugat, Stockholm and Taipei announce the winners of the Living Labs Global Award 2011.

The Award presented the major challenges faced by these cities in the coming years, to which 245 companies from 30 countries responded by presenting their solutions. With rapidly growing populations, budget pressures due to the financial crisis and increasing international competition for investment, talent and tourists cities are looking for innovative approaches to remain competitive. Cities represent a major, yet complex market, spending an annual EUR 3.5 trillion in public procurement alone

The cities of Barcelona, Cape Town, Eindhoven, Lagos, San Francisco, Sant Cugat, Stockholm and Taipei have announced eight winning solutions that were selected by 45 international users out of 245 submissions from 30 countries. Winning solutions will now be piloted in the participating cities, to evaluate their impact to meet the challenges.

In a unique global effort, eight cities joined forces with Living Labs Global to present their pressing challenges to the global business and technology community.

Challenges put forward by cities include the need to provide more efficient and sustainable urban services such as lighting using latest LED technologies; to rethink city services in the light of open data and apps developed by interest groups; to overcome media piracy undermining native film industries through digital distribution systems; or the need to provide financing and support to social entrepreneurs in African cities. The winning solutions are:

City of Barcelona: Citysolver, by Bitcarrier

City of Cape Town:  Venture Capital Cultivator Fund, by PoweredbyVC

City of Eindhoven: Integral Solution for Urban Infrastructures (SIIUR), by bdigital

City of Lagos: Eggup | Sell your films while preventing piracy, by Eggup.com

City of San Francisco: Open Data as a Platform for Citizen Service Delivery, by Socrata Inc.

City of Sant Cugat: Smart Parking for Smart Urban Living, by Worldsensing

City of Stockholm: Spotscout, by Spotscout Inc.

City of Taipei: A+ Care: Smart Autonomous TeleHealth Care Service, by Netown

Winners were announced after an international two-round jury process under auspices of Living Labs Global, a non-profit association based in Copenhagen working with 40 cities and 450 companies around the world to promote service innovation in cities.

The Award Ceremony was attended by 200 participants from 20 countries in Stockholm as part of the Stockholm Summit for Service Innovation in Cities.

The Living Labs Global Award 2011 is a unique global process providing full accountability in the evaluation through independent experts. The Award was carried out in partnership with Oracle Corporation, Farglory and supporting organisations from around the world.

About the Living Labs Global Award

Living Labs Global is a non-profit association based in Copenhagen (Denmark), working with 40 cities and 450 companies and research centres in Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas with a mission to open the market for service innovation in cities and overcoming key technology, organisation and trade barriers.

The Living Labs Global Award is an annual process over 8 months in which cities present their challenges and provide guidance to the business and technology community on future investment plans and needs. Solution providers respond by submitting existing technologies as entries for evaluation by an international jury.

Follow results and the upcoming Living Labs Global Award 2012 on Twitter. Facts: More than 557,000 local governments provide services to more than 50% of the world’s population with an annual spending of 3.5 Trillion Euros per year. New technologies can radically improve transport and mobility systems, access to finance, media distribution, social services and other key areas of urban life.

Interview with Anette Scheibe of Kista Science City: from Fossil Fuels to Intelligent Transport Solutions ‘the Stockholm Way’

Interview with Anette Scheibe of Kista Science City: from Fossil Fuels to Intelligent Transport Solutions ‘the Stockholm Way’.This entry is the first in a series of interviews conducted by Cluster in collaboration with Living Labs Global (LLG) in occasion of the second edition of the second edition of Living Labs Global Award, an international technology award for digital services that add high value to users in cities around the world. 8 global cities partnered with LLG to search for solutions to their most pressing local problems in a global context.

Call for Contributions to Business Guide on Innovative Public Procurement

Living Labs Global has been invited by euroPROC, a European Consortium gathering 10 European Regions (funded by European Regional Development Funds - Interreg IVC), to author & edit a guidebook for small- and medium-sized businesses on the business opportunities and strategic issues around new trends in Public Procurement. The Guidebook is to be published in digital and paper form in June 2011 and will be a highly relevant document for companies across the EU and beyond interested in entering and navigating new markets with innovative solutions. Public Procurement in the EU amounts to 16% of GDP, or EUR 1,889,394,720,000, and constitutes a significant market for innovative services and products, especially if procurement policies are clearly designed to consider sustainability and innovation measures. In Europe as in other global regions like the US and China, innovation in public procurement is supported by active policies to stimulate uptake of new technologies, higher quality services at reduced costs, and environmental and social impacts. Mechanisms that can unfold innovation, such as pre-commercial procurement or applying green measures to procurement are rarely understood by smaller businesses, that could benefit most from new processes.

Hence, the guidebook will focus on four great themes of policy that represent market opportunities for innovative companies:

-         Innovative Public Procurement and Lead-Market Policies

-          Green Public Procurement

-          Socially Responsible and Considerate Public Procurement

-          Electronic Procurement

We are issuing this call for contributions to make sure the Guidebook reflects the best possible insights from both government agencies (national, regional, local); businesses and professional expertise. Already high-profile government and business leaders have pledged their interest and availability.

Like our "Connected Cities: Your 256 Billion Euro Dividend" Handbook on Service Innovation in Cities, the new guidebook will apply a combination of highest quality design provided by Barcelona's Base Design with our insights into the issues that press SME's in entering public procurement markets with innovative products. We are aiming to provide our community with a valuable tool to assure that their innovations reach new markets.

If you are interested in making a contribution through pointing us to interesting cases, statistics, failures or success stories; share your opinion; or provide access to references please do not hesitate to contact me to discuss details or reply to this post.

We are committed to credit contributors, but respect also the interest by individuals to remain anonymous. Contributors will be invited to review the draft of chapters in the beginning of March 2011.

Call for Contributions to Business Guide on Innovative Public Procurement

Living Labs Global has been invited by euroPROC, a European Consortium gathering 10 European Regions (funded by European Regional Development Funds - Interreg IVC), to author & edit a guidebook for small- and medium-sized businesses on the business opportunities and strategic issues around new trends in Public Procurement. The Guidebook is to be published in digital and paper form in June 2011 and will be a highly relevant document for companies across the EU and beyond interested in entering and navigating new markets with innovative solutions. Public Procurement in the EU amounts to 16% of GDP, or EUR 1,889,394,720,000, and constitutes a significant market for innovative services and products, especially if procurement policies are clearly designed to consider sustainability and innovation measures. In Europe as in other global regions like the US and China, innovation in public procurement is supported by active policies to stimulate uptake of new technologies, higher quality services at reduced costs, and environmental and social impacts. Mechanisms that can unfold innovation, such as pre-commercial procurement or applying green measures to procurement are rarely understood by smaller businesses, that could benefit most from new processes.

Hence, the guidebook will focus on four great themes of policy that represent market opportunities for innovative companies:

-         Innovative Public Procurement and Lead-Market Policies

-          Green Public Procurement

-          Socially Responsible and Considerate Public Procurement

-          Electronic Procurement

We are issuing this call for contributions to make sure the Guidebook reflects the best possible insights from both government agencies (national, regional, local); businesses and professional expertise. Already high-profile government and business leaders have pledged their interest and availability.

Like our "Connected Cities: Your 256 Billion Euro Dividend" Handbook on Service Innovation in Cities, the new guidebook will apply a combination of highest quality design provided by Barcelona's Base Design with our insights into the issues that press SME's in entering public procurement markets with innovative products. We are aiming to provide our community with a valuable tool to assure that their innovations reach new markets.

If you are interested in making a contribution through pointing us to interesting cases, statistics, failures or success stories; share your opinion; or provide access to references please do not hesitate to contact me to discuss details or reply to this post.

We are committed to credit contributors, but respect also the interest by individuals to remain anonymous. Contributors will be invited to review the draft of chapters in the beginning of March 2011.

Unique IKEA Bonus

SFGateAs employees around the country and world received end-of-year bonuses this year, Swedish company IKEA prepared a rather unique gift.  US employees each received their own bicycle from the company.  The bike is not branded by IKEA, however it was delivered in the same fashion as other IKEA products: with a traditional instruction booklet in a small box, entirely in pieces requiring user assembly. “We hope this bike will be taken in the spirit of the season while supporting a healthy lifestyle and everyday sustainable transport,” said Mike Ward, IKEA US President.  Sarah Gilbert of WalletPop has suggested that the gift will be beneficial to the employees as well as the employer.  A healthy lifestyle will lead to less health-related costs borne by IKEA and more productive personnel.  She widely supports the gesture, as do most.

However, as some commenters have noted, these bikes are already showing up on Craigslist and eBay.  The one I found is being sold for $99 – perhaps the money is more valuable to some this season than a long term investment in health and sustainability.

-Terra Curtis

Unique IKEA Bonus

SFGateAs employees around the country and world received end-of-year bonuses this year, Swedish company IKEA prepared a rather unique gift.  US employees each received their own bicycle from the company.  The bike is not branded by IKEA, however it was delivered in the same fashion as other IKEA products: with a traditional instruction booklet in a small box, entirely in pieces requiring user assembly. “We hope this bike will be taken in the spirit of the season while supporting a healthy lifestyle and everyday sustainable transport,” said Mike Ward, IKEA US President.  Sarah Gilbert of WalletPop has suggested that the gift will be beneficial to the employees as well as the employer.  A healthy lifestyle will lead to less health-related costs borne by IKEA and more productive personnel.  She widely supports the gesture, as do most.

However, as some commenters have noted, these bikes are already showing up on Craigslist and eBay.  The one I found is being sold for $99 – perhaps the money is more valuable to some this season than a long term investment in health and sustainability.

-Terra Curtis