Stockholm

Eight Cities Announce Winners to Solve Major Urban Challenges at LLGA2011

The cities of Barcelona, Cape Town, Eindhoven, Lagos, San Francisco, Sant Cugat, Stockholm and Taipei announce the winners of the Living Labs Global Award 2011.

The Award presented the major challenges faced by these cities in the coming years, to which 245 companies from 30 countries responded by presenting their solutions. With rapidly growing populations, budget pressures due to the financial crisis and increasing international competition for investment, talent and tourists cities are looking for innovative approaches to remain competitive. Cities represent a major, yet complex market, spending an annual EUR 3.5 trillion in public procurement alone

The cities of Barcelona, Cape Town, Eindhoven, Lagos, San Francisco, Sant Cugat, Stockholm and Taipei have announced eight winning solutions that were selected by 45 international users out of 245 submissions from 30 countries. Winning solutions will now be piloted in the participating cities, to evaluate their impact to meet the challenges.

In a unique global effort, eight cities joined forces with Living Labs Global to present their pressing challenges to the global business and technology community.

Challenges put forward by cities include the need to provide more efficient and sustainable urban services such as lighting using latest LED technologies; to rethink city services in the light of open data and apps developed by interest groups; to overcome media piracy undermining native film industries through digital distribution systems; or the need to provide financing and support to social entrepreneurs in African cities. The winning solutions are:

City of Barcelona: Citysolver, by Bitcarrier

City of Cape Town:  Venture Capital Cultivator Fund, by PoweredbyVC

City of Eindhoven: Integral Solution for Urban Infrastructures (SIIUR), by bdigital

City of Lagos: Eggup | Sell your films while preventing piracy, by Eggup.com

City of San Francisco: Open Data as a Platform for Citizen Service Delivery, by Socrata Inc.

City of Sant Cugat: Smart Parking for Smart Urban Living, by Worldsensing

City of Stockholm: Spotscout, by Spotscout Inc.

City of Taipei: A+ Care: Smart Autonomous TeleHealth Care Service, by Netown

Winners were announced after an international two-round jury process under auspices of Living Labs Global, a non-profit association based in Copenhagen working with 40 cities and 450 companies around the world to promote service innovation in cities.

The Award Ceremony was attended by 200 participants from 20 countries in Stockholm as part of the Stockholm Summit for Service Innovation in Cities.

The Living Labs Global Award 2011 is a unique global process providing full accountability in the evaluation through independent experts. The Award was carried out in partnership with Oracle Corporation, Farglory and supporting organisations from around the world.

About the Living Labs Global Award

Living Labs Global is a non-profit association based in Copenhagen (Denmark), working with 40 cities and 450 companies and research centres in Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas with a mission to open the market for service innovation in cities and overcoming key technology, organisation and trade barriers.

The Living Labs Global Award is an annual process over 8 months in which cities present their challenges and provide guidance to the business and technology community on future investment plans and needs. Solution providers respond by submitting existing technologies as entries for evaluation by an international jury.

Follow results and the upcoming Living Labs Global Award 2012 on Twitter. Facts: More than 557,000 local governments provide services to more than 50% of the world’s population with an annual spending of 3.5 Trillion Euros per year. New technologies can radically improve transport and mobility systems, access to finance, media distribution, social services and other key areas of urban life.

Eight Cities Announce Winners to Solve Major Urban Challenges at LLGA2011

The cities of Barcelona, Cape Town, Eindhoven, Lagos, San Francisco, Sant Cugat, Stockholm and Taipei announce the winners of the Living Labs Global Award 2011.

The Award presented the major challenges faced by these cities in the coming years, to which 245 companies from 30 countries responded by presenting their solutions. With rapidly growing populations, budget pressures due to the financial crisis and increasing international competition for investment, talent and tourists cities are looking for innovative approaches to remain competitive. Cities represent a major, yet complex market, spending an annual EUR 3.5 trillion in public procurement alone

The cities of Barcelona, Cape Town, Eindhoven, Lagos, San Francisco, Sant Cugat, Stockholm and Taipei have announced eight winning solutions that were selected by 45 international users out of 245 submissions from 30 countries. Winning solutions will now be piloted in the participating cities, to evaluate their impact to meet the challenges.

In a unique global effort, eight cities joined forces with Living Labs Global to present their pressing challenges to the global business and technology community.

Challenges put forward by cities include the need to provide more efficient and sustainable urban services such as lighting using latest LED technologies; to rethink city services in the light of open data and apps developed by interest groups; to overcome media piracy undermining native film industries through digital distribution systems; or the need to provide financing and support to social entrepreneurs in African cities. The winning solutions are:

City of Barcelona: Citysolver, by Bitcarrier

City of Cape Town:  Venture Capital Cultivator Fund, by PoweredbyVC

City of Eindhoven: Integral Solution for Urban Infrastructures (SIIUR), by bdigital

City of Lagos: Eggup | Sell your films while preventing piracy, by Eggup.com

City of San Francisco: Open Data as a Platform for Citizen Service Delivery, by Socrata Inc.

City of Sant Cugat: Smart Parking for Smart Urban Living, by Worldsensing

City of Stockholm: Spotscout, by Spotscout Inc.

City of Taipei: A+ Care: Smart Autonomous TeleHealth Care Service, by Netown

Winners were announced after an international two-round jury process under auspices of Living Labs Global, a non-profit association based in Copenhagen working with 40 cities and 450 companies around the world to promote service innovation in cities.

The Award Ceremony was attended by 200 participants from 20 countries in Stockholm as part of the Stockholm Summit for Service Innovation in Cities.

The Living Labs Global Award 2011 is a unique global process providing full accountability in the evaluation through independent experts. The Award was carried out in partnership with Oracle Corporation, Farglory and supporting organisations from around the world.

About the Living Labs Global Award

Living Labs Global is a non-profit association based in Copenhagen (Denmark), working with 40 cities and 450 companies and research centres in Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas with a mission to open the market for service innovation in cities and overcoming key technology, organisation and trade barriers.

The Living Labs Global Award is an annual process over 8 months in which cities present their challenges and provide guidance to the business and technology community on future investment plans and needs. Solution providers respond by submitting existing technologies as entries for evaluation by an international jury.

Follow results and the upcoming Living Labs Global Award 2012 on Twitter. Facts: More than 557,000 local governments provide services to more than 50% of the world’s population with an annual spending of 3.5 Trillion Euros per year. New technologies can radically improve transport and mobility systems, access to finance, media distribution, social services and other key areas of urban life.

Impressions from our Cities Summit 2011

With 200 attendees from some 19 countries in Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas our Stockholm Summit on Service Innovation in Cities together with the Living Labs Global Award Ceremony was by many considered the most successful matchmaking event we organised to-date. Business leaders from large and small enterprises shared their technologies, visions and investment plans to make our cities smarter, more sustainable and accessible; policy makers outlined their challenges and achievements that will define the market for innovative solutions in cities for the years to come; and research centers shared their latest experiments, pilots and achievements. [slickr-flickr search=sets set=72157626713013712]

Visioning workshops brought together groups of cities and entrepreneurs to invent new approaches to major urban challenges such as visual impairment, parking, innovation and investment.

Our festive Living Labs Global Award 2011 Ceremony saw city leaders award the winning solutions that will now be piloted in Barcelona, Cape Town, Eindhoven, Lagos, San Francisco, Sant Cugat, Stockholm and Taipei. Congratulations to the winners!

Thanks to all who made this such a rewarding day, especially the Cities of Stockholm and Barcelona, Kista Science City, Oracle Corporation and Farglory as well as the many collaborators from all parts of the world.!

Experience Stockholm's solution for visually impaired!

If you participate in our Stockholm Summit on Service Innovation in Cities you will have an opportunity to experience e-Adept, a groundbreaking accessibility solution at the cocktail reception taking place at the offices of Astando on May 11th in central Stockholm. E-Adept is a navigation, mobility and accessibility solution developed in partnership with the City of Stockholm. It enables visually impaired persons to navigate the city unattended - including public transport - through real-time urban data and digital map integration.

After several years of user-centric development working closely with visually impaired citizens, a group of users is now piloting e-Adept for 5 weeks as a full-life experience. You will be available to learn first-hand about the radical impact to their daily lives, provide detailed experience accounts.

Further, you will be able to try out the solution as well as meet project leaders from Astando and the City of Stockholm.

  • 161 million people globally would see their lives transformed by e-Adept
  • 30,000 citizens of Barcelona or 380,000 citizens in New York are severely visually impaired
  • E-Adept costs Stockholm only EUR 360,000 per year to maintain and creates EUR 17 million in value for the city
  • Also by Astando is Billy Bike, winner of the Future of Biking call by the City of Copenhagen in 2010
Our Handbook on Service Innovation in Cities covers e-Adept in detail.

Experience Stockholm's solution for visually impaired!

If you participate in our Stockholm Summit on Service Innovation in Cities you will have an opportunity to experience e-Adept, a groundbreaking accessibility solution at the cocktail reception taking place at the offices of Astando on May 11th in central Stockholm. E-Adept is a navigation, mobility and accessibility solution developed in partnership with the City of Stockholm. It enables visually impaired persons to navigate the city unattended - including public transport - through real-time urban data and digital map integration.

After several years of user-centric development working closely with visually impaired citizens, a group of users is now piloting e-Adept for 5 weeks as a full-life experience. You will be available to learn first-hand about the radical impact to their daily lives, provide detailed experience accounts.

Further, you will be able to try out the solution as well as meet project leaders from Astando and the City of Stockholm.

  • 161 million people globally would see their lives transformed by e-Adept
  • 30,000 citizens of Barcelona or 380,000 citizens in New York are severely visually impaired
  • E-Adept costs Stockholm only EUR 360,000 per year to maintain and creates EUR 17 million in value for the city
  • Also by Astando is Billy Bike, winner of the Future of Biking call by the City of Copenhagen in 2010
Our Handbook on Service Innovation in Cities covers e-Adept in detail.

245 Entries for Living Labs Global Award 2011

Today we have closed submissions for the Living Labs Global Award 2011. Companies, research centres and NGOs from 127 cities in 29 countries submitted their Showcases to the Award.International juries, chaired by the partner cities of Barcelona, Cape Town, Eindhoven, Lagos, San Francisco, Sant Cugat, Taipei and Stockholm will start their work in the coming days and we will announce the shortlists on March 21st. Enjoy browsing the map of where innovations came from!

http://batchgeo.com/map/bb63209e1306a6d3ff112f81f3be8b67

View Map of Living Labs Global Award 2011 Entries in a full screen map

Interview with Anette Scheibe of Kista Science City: from Fossil Fuels to Intelligent Transport Solutions ‘the Stockholm Way’

Interview with Anette Scheibe of Kista Science City: from Fossil Fuels to Intelligent Transport Solutions ‘the Stockholm Way’.This entry is the first in a series of interviews conducted by Cluster in collaboration with Living Labs Global (LLG) in occasion of the second edition of the second edition of Living Labs Global Award, an international technology award for digital services that add high value to users in cities around the world. 8 global cities partnered with LLG to search for solutions to their most pressing local problems in a global context.

Eight Global Cities Launch Technology Award to Help 40 Million Citizens

Eight global cities from Europe, Asia, Africa and North America join us in a challenge to find innovative solutions to major societal problems by opening competition among international solution-, technology- and service providers. The eight winners of the Living Labs Global Showcase Award will be invited to pilot their solutions in these cities, proving the effectiveness of new solutions and offering a first step for innovative providers to enter new markets. http://www.livinglabs-global.com/flash/awards2011.swf

The participating cities, representing 40 million citizens from Europe, Africa, North America and Asia call for solutions that can solve some of their most pressing challenges:

  • Automation of Urban Services
  • Intelligent Urban Lighting Solutions for Social Interaction & Orientation
  • Venture finance for millions of African entrepreneurs
  • Sustainable Initiative on Intellectual Property Protection
  • Creating the Next Generation of Government
  • Solutions for digitally enabled accessible ecoCities
  • Intelligent Transport Solutions
  • Smart solutions for 10,000 Smart Houses, 16 Green Communities, 1 Eco-City

Oracle Corporation and Asia’s Farglory have been named as corporate partners for the 2011 Living Labs Global Award. Submissions follow the format of the Living Labs Global Showcase and can be submitted for free until the 28th of February 2011. A shortlist of the top 40 Showcases will be presented by the international juries on March 21st 2011. Winners will be announced at the Award Ceremony on May 12th 2011 at the Stockholm Summit on Service Innovation in Cities.

Behind each Category lies the commitment of a city to pilot the winning showcase, with full institutional support to evaluate the impact the solution can have on reaching the community’s objectives.

My war on regional digitized road and transport data in Stockholm

During the years 2006 – 2009 when working in the regional public transport I found an lucky opportunity to fill one of my companies most frustrating data black holes with ones and zeros. But you can’t win them all! Listen to my story. You are one year old when you learn to walk, you are five or six when you learn to ride a bike and at least 16 when learning to drive. All of us have as a primary means of traveling - walking (and here I include all in wheelchairs) and even motorists are occasionally forced to leave their car - at least to be able to refuel the car.

Although, since the modern era began, cities has focused on the car's traction, and to be frank , we have built cities such as displacing pedestrians as second-class citizens. When Sweden a few years ago legislated that motorists have an obligation to give way to pedestrians intending to cross the street - then motorists raged and state that this is a traffic hazard!

In wintertime all municipalities in Sweden are carefully plowing the roads. Although, in many of these municipalities leaders has decided that the property owners shall be responsible for clearing snow from sidewalks. How many property owners do you think it is along a normal Swedish roadside - and how likely do you make it a pedestrian is offered a safe and pleasant journey? And bike lanes often proves to be a perfect place for the snow brigade to put aside the snow.

In Sweden, the public exercise of power is highly decentralized and we have a very comprehensive municipal planning monopoly. But there is also very important to have a coherent national road infrastructure. Sweden therefore decided very early that it was important to establish a national database of road network. Yes, that is, the motorist road network, administrated by the National Swedish Road Administration. First on the runway by filling it with content was in fact the forest industry. They used this excellent almost free of charge resource to post their temporary forest roads so that their forest machines and trucks could find their way to all the remote and well hidden places where harvesting is currently underway. See there - an excellent commercial application of one of the society offered national data infrastructures!

In this decentralized Sweden, the municipalities are also responsible for the local road network. Therefore, also the digitization of the local road network has been a local affair and the Swedish Road Administration has therefore never been able to force any municipality neither to gather the data, nor to deliver it anywhere. Of course, the local politicians has limited budgets and if he / she has to choose among local public opinions, the one that demands for digitized road networks has never been particularly vociferous. In fact, even after 14 years of operation, this database NVDB has not yet signed contracts with all Swedish municipalities.

In fact, when NVDB established in 1996, bike lanes were not even on the horizon. Today as the National Traffic Administration offers the possibility after many years of nagging (not the least from me) quite many municipalities have supplied data, but there is still no one offering municipalities an opportunity to store a digitized pedestrian lane database.

I used to work in SL, the Stockholm County Public Transportation Authority, and there I was responsible for the development of Internet and mobile services. Such a core service is the travel planner. SL's network is an integrated intermodal network that spans 26 municipalities and, yes, you already understand the problem. All the county has actually delivered the digitized road network and that means that all players, especially yellow pages business and Garmin and TomTom etc have been able to develop great services. But in public transport you are totally dependent on that the footpaths are digitized - for all public transport passengers must get to and from stations and bus stops. For SL, the lack of an across municipal boundaries associated digitized pedestrian network the travel planner becoming increasingly a problem as customers always expect better and more advanced services.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sw78Pwtg38w&w=425&h=350]

A few years ago when Stockholm won the opportunity to host the ITS World Congress, I saw an opportunity to change this. I put on the top of my (read SL) wish list a coherent and digitized route network for walking and biking. I quite easily in these collaborative surrounding of the National Swedish Road Administration, the National Swedish Rail Administration, The National Swedish Transport Administration, the City of Stockholm, the National Swedish Railway Company and many, many other stakeholders found friends of the mission, realizing the importance of this. Mobility services for people with impairments, police and rescue services must be found to the door even on local private pedestrian areas in closed yards, the postal service must even find doors in the z-axis, so this should be a easy piece, I thought. I built relations with ALL, and all agreed on the importance of access to such data - but no one was willing to either take responsibility or to share responsibility, this includes my former employer.

In despair I went to one of the largest commercial global players in GIS. They had a great interest - to map the inner city of Stockholm on the basis of the business traveler's perspective ... but could not see any profit to make in the mapping of walking paths in the Stockholm archipelago. No luck again.

Finally I found one guy with the same burning fire inside for the same thing as me, he ran the exact same question from one of the largest and leading infrastructure consultancy firms, actually he was the CEO of a large subsidiary specializing in GIS.

Today he is no longer there and still today you cannot find a coherent pedestrian and bicycle road network in this county.

This, ladies and gentlemen, this is my biggest carrier failure. And I indeed take it very personal.

- Åke Lindström, Market Director Kista Science City

My war on regional digitized road and transport data in Stockholm

During the years 2006 – 2009 when working in the regional public transport I found an lucky opportunity to fill one of my companies most frustrating data black holes with ones and zeros. But you can’t win them all! Listen to my story. You are one year old when you learn to walk, you are five or six when you learn to ride a bike and at least 16 when learning to drive. All of us have as a primary means of traveling - walking (and here I include all in wheelchairs) and even motorists are occasionally forced to leave their car - at least to be able to refuel the car.

Although, since the modern era began, cities has focused on the car's traction, and to be frank , we have built cities such as displacing pedestrians as second-class citizens. When Sweden a few years ago legislated that motorists have an obligation to give way to pedestrians intending to cross the street - then motorists raged and state that this is a traffic hazard!

In wintertime all municipalities in Sweden are carefully plowing the roads. Although, in many of these municipalities leaders has decided that the property owners shall be responsible for clearing snow from sidewalks. How many property owners do you think it is along a normal Swedish roadside - and how likely do you make it a pedestrian is offered a safe and pleasant journey? And bike lanes often proves to be a perfect place for the snow brigade to put aside the snow.

In Sweden, the public exercise of power is highly decentralized and we have a very comprehensive municipal planning monopoly. But there is also very important to have a coherent national road infrastructure. Sweden therefore decided very early that it was important to establish a national database of road network. Yes, that is, the motorist road network, administrated by the National Swedish Road Administration. First on the runway by filling it with content was in fact the forest industry. They used this excellent almost free of charge resource to post their temporary forest roads so that their forest machines and trucks could find their way to all the remote and well hidden places where harvesting is currently underway. See there - an excellent commercial application of one of the society offered national data infrastructures!

In this decentralized Sweden, the municipalities are also responsible for the local road network. Therefore, also the digitization of the local road network has been a local affair and the Swedish Road Administration has therefore never been able to force any municipality neither to gather the data, nor to deliver it anywhere. Of course, the local politicians has limited budgets and if he / she has to choose among local public opinions, the one that demands for digitized road networks has never been particularly vociferous. In fact, even after 14 years of operation, this database NVDB has not yet signed contracts with all Swedish municipalities.

In fact, when NVDB established in 1996, bike lanes were not even on the horizon. Today as the National Traffic Administration offers the possibility after many years of nagging (not the least from me) quite many municipalities have supplied data, but there is still no one offering municipalities an opportunity to store a digitized pedestrian lane database.

I used to work in SL, the Stockholm County Public Transportation Authority, and there I was responsible for the development of Internet and mobile services. Such a core service is the travel planner. SL's network is an integrated intermodal network that spans 26 municipalities and, yes, you already understand the problem. All the county has actually delivered the digitized road network and that means that all players, especially yellow pages business and Garmin and TomTom etc have been able to develop great services. But in public transport you are totally dependent on that the footpaths are digitized - for all public transport passengers must get to and from stations and bus stops. For SL, the lack of an across municipal boundaries associated digitized pedestrian network the travel planner becoming increasingly a problem as customers always expect better and more advanced services.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sw78Pwtg38w&w=425&h=350]

A few years ago when Stockholm won the opportunity to host the ITS World Congress, I saw an opportunity to change this. I put on the top of my (read SL) wish list a coherent and digitized route network for walking and biking. I quite easily in these collaborative surrounding of the National Swedish Road Administration, the National Swedish Rail Administration, The National Swedish Transport Administration, the City of Stockholm, the National Swedish Railway Company and many, many other stakeholders found friends of the mission, realizing the importance of this. Mobility services for people with impairments, police and rescue services must be found to the door even on local private pedestrian areas in closed yards, the postal service must even find doors in the z-axis, so this should be a easy piece, I thought. I built relations with ALL, and all agreed on the importance of access to such data - but no one was willing to either take responsibility or to share responsibility, this includes my former employer.

In despair I went to one of the largest commercial global players in GIS. They had a great interest - to map the inner city of Stockholm on the basis of the business traveler's perspective ... but could not see any profit to make in the mapping of walking paths in the Stockholm archipelago. No luck again.

Finally I found one guy with the same burning fire inside for the same thing as me, he ran the exact same question from one of the largest and leading infrastructure consultancy firms, actually he was the CEO of a large subsidiary specializing in GIS.

Today he is no longer there and still today you cannot find a coherent pedestrian and bicycle road network in this county.

This, ladies and gentlemen, this is my biggest carrier failure. And I indeed take it very personal.

- Åke Lindström, Market Director Kista Science City

Copenhagen Picks Billy-Bike Navigation Solution to Pilot the Future

37 companies from around the world have presented solutions for piloting the future of biking in Copenhagen. The winner was announced today at the Copenhagen | Barcelona | Kaohsiung Summit on Service Innovation in Cities by Copenhagen's Health Mayor Ninna Thomsen: a travel plan that displays the most bike-friendly route through town.When more than 36 percent of citizens use their bikes every day to get to work, school or university, Copenhagen also needs a travel plan for cyclists, says the Mayor for Healthcare of Copenhagen, Ninna Thomsen.

Billy Bike was announced today to 20 cities and 50 companies by Health Mayor Ninna Thomsen at the Copenhagen | Barcelona | Kaohsiung Summit on Service Innovation in Cities, as the chosen solution after a 4-month competition. 37 solutions that can improve health, reduce CO2 emissions, and make it easier for citizens to move around the city were submitted from 17 countries in Europe, Asia and North America in response to a call for pilot launched by the City of Copenhagen and Living Labs Global in July.

Astando, the company that first implemented Billy Bike in Stockholm, will now engage in detailed planning meetings to bring the solution to the citizens of Copenhagen for a pilot in 2011. Billy Bike was chosen by a group of evaluators including the City of Copenhagen and the Bicycle Association of Copenhagen. All the world's cities need innovative solutions that make everyday life easier for citizens and call for green choices while allowing for improvements in efficiency of municipal services. There are plenty of companies that develop these solutions, but it is a challenge to get them into service in the city. So we try to push this by bringing together cities and companies together, says Ninna Thomsen.

A product such as Billy Bike has a great potential. For example, we imagine that the home care services in Copenhagen can use it as a tool to get faster and safer around town, just as technology can also be used to help our visually impaired citizens find their way, as they already do in Stockholm today, says Ninna Thomsen.

The Future Bike Call for Pilots has shown that already today many solutions can be found to revolutionise our cities when a city like Copenhagen presents its needs. These are solutions that exist today, helping to reduce the barrier to implementation for cities and opening international opportunities for companies like Astando, that continually invent new urban solutions like Billy Bike affecting the lives of millions of citizens. In the coming months, the pilot will bring this solution to life for the citizens of Copenhagen to build their own opinion and contribute to the future of the city's services.

Connecting cities: a Cluster.eu interview with Sascha Haselmayer

Cluster.eu, a great online and published magazine, gave me some challenging questions about our book "Connected Cities: Your 256 Billion Euro Dividend". Read it here - Connecting cities: an interview with Sascha Haselmayer.

Now out: Spanish Edition of our Handbook on Service Innovation in Cities

Living Labs Global is pleased to invite you to the launch of the book “Tu Dividendo de 256.516 Millones”, the updated and Spanish language edition of our handbook “Connected Cities: Your 256 Billion Euro Dividend” be published by the University of Barcelona. The book features a new epilogue by Professor Xavier Torrens, placing the book as a critical contribution in the current debate on local and urban innovation policy.

We will present the book on the occasion of INTA's 34th World Urban Development Congress, in Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain) during the Welcome Reception on Sunday, October 24, 2010, from 19:00-21:00 and the first plenary session on Wednesday, October 27th.

The book is now available to order from the University of Barcelona webstore or can be bought in one of the University of Barcelona’s bookshops.

Our Handbook on Innovation in Services and Mobility in Cities - "Connected Cities: Your 256 Billion Euro Dividend" - now out!

We are pleased to announce that our new Handbook on Service Innovation in Cities is now out, published by the DesignLondon at the Royal College of Art. The result of a collaborative effort involving more than 20 contributors, the book presents rich original data and serves as a resource for professionals from both public and private sectors, as well as entrepreneurs, engaged in the complex yet potentially profitable market for service innovations in cities.

You can flick through and order the book now at Amazon (UK), Amazon (US).

Mobility is not a technology, but a paradigm shift. The user, as citizen, professional, or visitor is in a state of mobility represented by the ubiquity of mobile phones in our society. Why this book asks, have highly appreciated services like mobile parking, tourism services, or solutions for the visually impaired not taken off despite the astronomical investments into digital infrastructures in the past decade? Why, have these infrastructures not had the productivity impact that the internet had on our economies, when more than 60% of the world population have access to them?

256 Billion Euro is the sum of opportunity presented in this book, following real business cases and examples of mobility and service innovations in cities. Drawing on the rich insights of Living Labs Global, the book illustrates what defines the market for mobility, neglected by many for its complexity. It logically structures the market opportunities, frustrations and successes, and actors that make or break success into a coherent call for action to fundamentally change how we deliver services in cities.
This book reveals important insights for public leaders, local politicians, service professionals in public and private organisations, entrepreneurs, technology experts, consultants and researchers interested in promoting innovation and excellence in cities today.

Showcase Award coverage by German National TV 3sat

3sat neues, a programme covering new technologies on German national television attended the Living Labs Global Showcase Award Ceremony, covering the event and airing interviews with Lluis Recoder, Mayor of Sant Cugat, Sascha Haselmayer, General Director Living Labs Global, and Josep Miquel Pique, CEO of 22@ Barcelona. The coverage celebrated the efforts by Living Labs Global to find innovative solutions to societal problems based on a range of technologies and Showcased the Taxi2 mobile solution, presented for the first time to the public at the event; Urbiotica's solutions for a digital urban operating system of wireless sensors and management; and the intelligent streetlighting systems in 22@ Barcelona.

Here the link to the coverage of the Living Labs Global Showcase Award (German)

Here the link to the coverage of 22@ Barcelona and Urbiotica (German)

3sat neues - full programme - Mobile World Congress and Living Labs Global Showcase Award

Showcase Award coverage by German National TV 3sat

3sat neues, a programme covering new technologies on German national television attended the Living Labs Global Showcase Award Ceremony, covering the event and airing interviews with Lluis Recoder, Mayor of Sant Cugat, Sascha Haselmayer, General Director Living Labs Global, and Josep Miquel Pique, CEO of 22@ Barcelona. The coverage celebrated the efforts by Living Labs Global to find innovative solutions to societal problems based on a range of technologies and Showcased the Taxi2 mobile solution, presented for the first time to the public at the event; Urbiotica's solutions for a digital urban operating system of wireless sensors and management; and the intelligent streetlighting systems in 22@ Barcelona.

Here the link to the coverage of the Living Labs Global Showcase Award (German)

Here the link to the coverage of 22@ Barcelona and Urbiotica (German)

3sat neues - full programme - Mobile World Congress and Living Labs Global Showcase Award

Living Labs Global Showcase Award Ceremony

As the culmination of the four month Living Labs Global Showcase Award process, over 100 representatives from Europe, North America and Asia attended the Showcase Award Ceremony in Sant Cugat des Valles. The three hour event was a unique opportunity for the nine award category cities and the 45 showcase award finalists to learn about other innovative entries and to celebrate their own contribution to the competition. Sascha Haselmayer, the Director of Living Labs Global, opened the ceremony by emphasizing the truly global nature of the competition, highlighting that the 317 entries submitted for the Award came from 28 countries across four continents. Mr. Haselmayer further elaborated that this kind of global collaboration in service development is unprecedented and is a testimony to the need for more transparent marketplaces for digital and mobile technologies and services, increased cooperation between municipalities and more open-minded service acquisition processes; therein, Mr. Haselmayer suggested that this Awards process is just an initial step towards developing and delivering better urban services through more efficient and effective processes. Without a doubt this was a sentiment shared by most everyone in attendance, municipal representatives and entrepreneurs alike. Following this initial opening by Mr. Haselmayer and the city of Sant Cugat, the ceremony proceeded with individual city categories, beginning with Barcelona and ending with Sant Cugat. Of the nine category cities, only the cities of Taipei and Chicago were unable to deliver the Award in person. Instead, these award partners congratulated their winners by telecast from their respective locations. Prior to announcing the winning Showcase for each category, the Living Labs Global team aired unseen footage from the shortlisted category videos; these videos were presented to jurors by entrants to help them to better understand the technology behind each innovation and the possible applications for the technology. Each video montage gave attendees a glimpse of the innovative solutions shortlisted by each city and illuminated the diverse nature of the solutions on offer. All of the winning showcases and the shortlisted showcase videos are currently available to be viewed on the Living Labs Global website. The winning showcases included Autonomous Sensors to Monitor Garbage Capacity in Urban Dumpsters for Barcelona, Energy Saving through Smart Applications for Caceres, Sustainable Food for Chicago, the Local Innovation Plan for Eindhoven, the Central Intelligent Irrigation Controller for Oeiras, the Central Intelligent Irrigation Controller for Oeiras, Sustainable Food and Wikiloc Active Routes for La Selva, Real-time Parking Management in a City for Sant Cugat, Open Green Map for Stockholm, and Wikiloc Active Routes and Taxi2 for Taipei. Once the last award was handed off by Sant Cugat, attendees had the opportunity to network and meet with fellow event participants over an offer of delicious appetizers and drinks. Perhaps the most exciting consequence of an event like this is that it gives cities and companies the opportunity to see what other cities are pursuing in terms of service innovation and their long-term service plan. Whereas the Portuguese city of Oeiras’ category had focused upon improved water management, they walked away inspired by the participatory technologies implemented in the city of Hamburg by the firm German firm TuTech Innovation. Needless to say, it will be exciting to see what the next year holds in terms of pilots and other service acquisitions for Showcase Award Participants and Winners and we look forward to keeping you up to date as success stories unfold.

Nine Global Cities launch joint award for technologies to help millions of citizens and visitors

9 cities from Europe, Asia and the United States join forces with Living Labs Global in a challenge to find the innovative solutions to major societal problems by opening competition among international solution-, technology- and service providers.
The 9 winners of the Living Labs Global Showcase Award will be invited to pilot their solutions in these cities, proving the effectiveness of new solutions and offering a first step for innovative providers to enter new markets.
Today, we announce the launch of the Living Labs Global Showcase Award in partnership with global cities such as Chicago, Taipei and Barcelona as well as smaller cities such as Eindhoven, Sant Cugat and Caceres. This award is open for companies and organizations that have developed digital solutions that add high value to users in cities around the world.
Living Labs Global has partnered with global cities, representing around 12 million citizens from Europe, the US and Asia to call for solutions that can solve some of their most pressing challenges. Challenges include social inclusion, digital tourism, water management, urban service automation, citizen participation, healthcare and mobility. Submissions follow the format of the Living Labs Global Showcase, which already today presents more than 230 international service innovations. Submissions to qualify for the Living Labs Global Showcase Award can be submitted until the 1st of December 2009.
9 Categories for the Award are being presented in partnership with communities that seek to identify the best solutions to meet their strategic challenges. Showcases will be reviewed against all categories, and a shortlist of the top 5 Showcases will be presented by the juries on December 15th 2009. The final Award winners will be announced at the Award Ceremony on February 14th 2009, the eve of the Mobile World Congress.
Instead of cash-prizes, Award Winners will be invited by the partner cities to pilot their solution in a real-life environment with full institutional support and evaluation by the cities, offering a first step into key international markets.

Chicago, Taipei and Barcelona, Stockholm, Eindhoven, Sant Cugat, Caceres and La Selva join forces with Living Labs Global in a challenge to find the innovative solutions to major societal problems by opening competition among international solution-, technology- and service providers.

The 9 winners of the Living Labs Global Showcase Award will be invited to pilot their solutions in these cities, proving the effectiveness of new solutions and offering a first step for innovative providers to enter new markets. This award is open for companies and organizations that have developed digital solutions that add high value to users in cities around the world.

Living Labs Global has partnered with these cities, representing around 12 million citizens from Europe, the US and Asia to call for solutions that can solve some of their most pressing challenges. Challenges include social inclusion, digital tourism, water management, urban service automation, citizen participation, healthcare and mobility. Submissions follow the format of the Living Labs Global Showcase, which already today presents more than 230 international service innovations. Submissions to qualify for the Living Labs Global Showcase Award can be submitted until the 1st of December 2009.

9 Categories for the Award are being presented in partnership with communities that seek to identify the best solutions to meet their strategic challenges. Showcases will be reviewed against all categories, and a shortlist of the top 5 Showcases will be presented by the juries on December 15th 2009. The final Award winners will be announced at the Award Ceremony on February 14th 2010, the eve of the Mobile World Congress.

Instead of cash-prizes, Award Winners will be invited by the partner cities to pilot their solution in a real-life environment with full institutional support and evaluation by the cities, offering a first step into key international markets.

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mVisitors: Challenges and Opportunities in Mobile Tourism

As chair of the session on mVisitors, at Living Labs Forum Barcelona, May 30 2006, Session 2 I would like to provide a short review of the outcomes of the discussions attended on mVisitors and mTourists by representatives of 12 regions. The point of departure for the session was the fact that a tourist is:

  • normally in a mobile situation;
  • needs instant information and interactive services;
  • is willing to pay for relevant services;
  • a prioritised audience for communities and hospitality businesses.

Tourists and Visitors are today recognized as a prime target group that not only generates economic values to local stakeholders but also tends to act as an eye opener for potential investors and potential citizens. A positive visit acts a proof of concept. In spite of the economic potentials very little has been done to offer visitors tailor-made mobile information services. Two examples were mentioned:

It has been calculated that the recent 3GSM World Congress in Barcelona attracted an income to the city''s economy in the region of 100 million Euros via the 50.000 international visitors. In spite of that, no mVisitors service was offered at the 2006 event. Not even a prototype was launched in spite of coinciding theme of the conference. (Incidentally, a new service called 7010 was launched as a pilot during IGC which will provide several mVisitor services - the pilot sadly excluded foreign mobile phones). The same was the case during the last winter Olympic Games in Torino. An mStrategy for the Olympics was proposed in advance but no decision was taken. In both cases, the situation can be contrasted by the mVisitors system launched in conjunction with the City of Stockholm 750 anniversary a few years ago. The mobile platform was used to show the brand of Stockholm as a leader in mobile ICTs and solutions. A few months later the Stockholm prototype was shown for the City of Beijing. The presentation worked as trigger, since the mobile platform had been pioneered in a real city environment, hence being legitimized. In a city-to-city dialogue trust was generated and the decision was taken to start the so called Beijing Digital Olympics 2008. This example can also be seen as an ideal outcome from a living lab context.

Inspiration and trust was built between two parties and the business community could gain a market access. One natural question was raised: why is it difficult to start mVisitors projects? The answer focused upon the fact that the traditional infrastructural investments are known and easier to cope with along the classical channels and well-known business-models. It was clearly said that some tourism organisations simply do not know that the technical structure is now available and that a breakthrough basically is a question of organisation and some leadership. It was also reported, that often there simply are no mStrategies in the community. In the absence of such an mStrategy few decision makers can act. (In a reference to Barcelona / Catalunya it was said that it was still not too late to develop a mVisitors mobile service in time for the next 3GSM event 2007, priming the ground for a significant impact in 2008. Such an initiative has now been outlined in the so-called branding manual for Living Labs Catalunya where mobile solutions form an important role in the concept of Simpli-City).

A conclusion was reached that well documented pilot projects can act as catalysts (see above the Beijing example) for more proactive actions. Thus, the Living Labs Global Showcase, containing numerous forerunning mobile solutions, can play a crucial role to speed up the European performance even in places where the actors are normally dragging behind. In an innovative exchange, a number of Unique Selling Propositions (U.S.P.), which could be communicated via the mobile phone, were identified from across the participating regions. Since each place has a strong competitive pressure to deliver unique offerings to the potential visitors and to make them visible the session tried to find some natural and unique links between the various living labs.mFood: One such unique theme is the food industry and all the connected offerings. The first cluster being mentioned was the “Kingdom of Culinary Art and Meal” in the middle of Sweden. An in depth dialogue has been established between Living Labs Europe and the City of Grythyttan and the surrounding region. Here a unique culinary university education is established. One of the important resources is a world leading library containing cookbooks and recipes from all over the world. The proposal now is to offer a unique mobile service to customers based on all the culinary knowledge from Grythyttan. For instance, customers in store to buy the ingredients for the meal can use the mobile phone in order to get instant access to the relevant recipe. The mobile service can also contain a supplementary voice-based help which instructs the customer on how to prepare the meal at home in their kitchen. On October 20-21, 2006 an international conference will be arranged in Grythyttan with approximately 250-300 participants from the network of culinary activities. This is a big meeting in the centre of Grythyttan and in collaboration with Nordic House of Culinary Art and other partners.

It was concluded that other Living Lab places may participate in this event. Among the participants interest was expressed from Torino / Piedmonte with its outstanding culinary traditions as well as their unique concept of “slow food”. In addition, IT Øresund, Catalunya, Minho (Portugal) and Budapest notified their interests. It was concluded that the mFood approach is also an illustrative example of collaborative and crossborder effort to build critical mass.

The mobile platform acts here as a gateway for easy access with the customers. It also shows how Living Labs Europe can fulfill its role as cluster-builder. mReligion: Another clustering theme was outlined by Joao Carvalho representative from the Minho region in Portugal. His initiative was named “mReligion” with the aim to improve the access to religious icons and tourist offerings for the growing number of religous tourism activities in the region. Santiago de Compostela was used to illustrate the huge potential for more informative service along the 400 km pilgrimage road ending in Galicia.

In parallel to the above examples the automotive Mecca of Stuttgart could well find a natural clustering approach in the field of automotive mobile road services. One project in the mWatch kaleidoscope is the location based visitors systems adopted for cars and run by M-Lab at the Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Engineering. Interestingly enough, Stuttgart may also be ideally placed to address the mTourism and other services for non-urban areas - as the car acts as the information device and space rather than external advertising or service zones - as was presented in the Mobile Marketing in Urban Spaces initiative. Some projects in the same direction are underway in the Gothenburg cluster called Telematic Valley.

Estonia and Finland also host projects relevant for the automotive industry and mVisitors. It should be added that numerous cases in the Living Labs Global Showcase are focusing on mVisitors. As an illustration the following cases are mentioned: Tourist services in Barcelona utilising Bluetooth access points to enable local interactive multimedia services on the mobile (FuturLink); Mobile Marketing in Urban Spaces in Hamburg (with collaboration in Catalunya, Budapest and Vaestervik); Mobile city information system in Stuttgart; Oyster card in London aiming at easy payments throughout the London public transportation with its 26 million travelers each day; Ticket@mobile by XSmart in the Greater Zürich Area; the city of Malmoe provides tourists with a so-called Instant Phone Guide; the Estonian project Audio Guide is available in 6 languages, visitors to Tallinn airport are welcomed via a Wifi area, a mobile positioning system called PinPointMgine in the city of Tartu is helping the visitors to find their way. Stefan Malmborg (Vaestervik) presented the mStrategy of Boat Meet (35.000 visitors 2005), jens Bley (Living Labs Germany) exposed some of the underlying marketing opportunities and infrastructures that should be considered for mVisitors: Train TV, 10.000 Multimedia Booths rolled out by T-Com. Despite this broad range of services, lessons were learnt also from Estonia, where these services are practically unknown to visitor. Marketing of mVisitor services therefore remains a key challenge, as they often rely entirely on the mobile phone (unlike the Mobile Marketing in Urban Spaces model which interlinks traditional with mobile information channels). Whilst impressive solutions where reported from Tallinn, awareness or experience (even by visitors in the rooom) were extremely low.

Another significant challenge raised were the roaming charges. Many visitors prefer not even to switch-on their devices for fear of unpredictable costs. Intransparency of costs (especially data roaming) makes users averse to exploring services. A map for 4 EUR download costs may not even be competitive with an extensive paper version. Examples were presented from the Netherlands (rent a PDA for your stay) or Hong Kong (get a local SIM card with your tourist map) indicate some of the helplessness of some regions in trying to open the mTourism channel.

mVisitors: Challenges and Opportunities in Mobile Tourism

As chair of the session on mVisitors, at Living Labs Forum Barcelona, May 30 2006, Session 2 I would like to provide a short review of the outcomes of the discussions attended on mVisitors and mTourists by representatives of 12 regions. The point of departure for the session was the fact that a tourist is:

  • normally in a mobile situation;
  • needs instant information and interactive services;
  • is willing to pay for relevant services;
  • a prioritised audience for communities and hospitality businesses.

Tourists and Visitors are today recognized as a prime target group that not only generates economic values to local stakeholders but also tends to act as an eye opener for potential investors and potential citizens. A positive visit acts a proof of concept. In spite of the economic potentials very little has been done to offer visitors tailor-made mobile information services. Two examples were mentioned:

It has been calculated that the recent 3GSM World Congress in Barcelona attracted an income to the city''s economy in the region of 100 million Euros via the 50.000 international visitors. In spite of that, no mVisitors service was offered at the 2006 event. Not even a prototype was launched in spite of coinciding theme of the conference. (Incidentally, a new service called 7010 was launched as a pilot during IGC which will provide several mVisitor services - the pilot sadly excluded foreign mobile phones). The same was the case during the last winter Olympic Games in Torino. An mStrategy for the Olympics was proposed in advance but no decision was taken. In both cases, the situation can be contrasted by the mVisitors system launched in conjunction with the City of Stockholm 750 anniversary a few years ago. The mobile platform was used to show the brand of Stockholm as a leader in mobile ICTs and solutions. A few months later the Stockholm prototype was shown for the City of Beijing. The presentation worked as trigger, since the mobile platform had been pioneered in a real city environment, hence being legitimized. In a city-to-city dialogue trust was generated and the decision was taken to start the so called Beijing Digital Olympics 2008. This example can also be seen as an ideal outcome from a living lab context.

Inspiration and trust was built between two parties and the business community could gain a market access. One natural question was raised: why is it difficult to start mVisitors projects? The answer focused upon the fact that the traditional infrastructural investments are known and easier to cope with along the classical channels and well-known business-models. It was clearly said that some tourism organisations simply do not know that the technical structure is now available and that a breakthrough basically is a question of organisation and some leadership. It was also reported, that often there simply are no mStrategies in the community. In the absence of such an mStrategy few decision makers can act. (In a reference to Barcelona / Catalunya it was said that it was still not too late to develop a mVisitors mobile service in time for the next 3GSM event 2007, priming the ground for a significant impact in 2008. Such an initiative has now been outlined in the so-called branding manual for Living Labs Catalunya where mobile solutions form an important role in the concept of Simpli-City).

A conclusion was reached that well documented pilot projects can act as catalysts (see above the Beijing example) for more proactive actions. Thus, the Living Labs Global Showcase, containing numerous forerunning mobile solutions, can play a crucial role to speed up the European performance even in places where the actors are normally dragging behind. In an innovative exchange, a number of Unique Selling Propositions (U.S.P.), which could be communicated via the mobile phone, were identified from across the participating regions. Since each place has a strong competitive pressure to deliver unique offerings to the potential visitors and to make them visible the session tried to find some natural and unique links between the various living labs.mFood: One such unique theme is the food industry and all the connected offerings. The first cluster being mentioned was the “Kingdom of Culinary Art and Meal” in the middle of Sweden. An in depth dialogue has been established between Living Labs Europe and the City of Grythyttan and the surrounding region. Here a unique culinary university education is established. One of the important resources is a world leading library containing cookbooks and recipes from all over the world. The proposal now is to offer a unique mobile service to customers based on all the culinary knowledge from Grythyttan. For instance, customers in store to buy the ingredients for the meal can use the mobile phone in order to get instant access to the relevant recipe. The mobile service can also contain a supplementary voice-based help which instructs the customer on how to prepare the meal at home in their kitchen. On October 20-21, 2006 an international conference will be arranged in Grythyttan with approximately 250-300 participants from the network of culinary activities. This is a big meeting in the centre of Grythyttan and in collaboration with Nordic House of Culinary Art and other partners.

It was concluded that other Living Lab places may participate in this event. Among the participants interest was expressed from Torino / Piedmonte with its outstanding culinary traditions as well as their unique concept of “slow food”. In addition, IT Øresund, Catalunya, Minho (Portugal) and Budapest notified their interests. It was concluded that the mFood approach is also an illustrative example of collaborative and crossborder effort to build critical mass.

The mobile platform acts here as a gateway for easy access with the customers. It also shows how Living Labs Europe can fulfill its role as cluster-builder. mReligion: Another clustering theme was outlined by Joao Carvalho representative from the Minho region in Portugal. His initiative was named “mReligion” with the aim to improve the access to religious icons and tourist offerings for the growing number of religous tourism activities in the region. Santiago de Compostela was used to illustrate the huge potential for more informative service along the 400 km pilgrimage road ending in Galicia.

In parallel to the above examples the automotive Mecca of Stuttgart could well find a natural clustering approach in the field of automotive mobile road services. One project in the mWatch kaleidoscope is the location based visitors systems adopted for cars and run by M-Lab at the Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Engineering. Interestingly enough, Stuttgart may also be ideally placed to address the mTourism and other services for non-urban areas - as the car acts as the information device and space rather than external advertising or service zones - as was presented in the Mobile Marketing in Urban Spaces initiative. Some projects in the same direction are underway in the Gothenburg cluster called Telematic Valley.

Estonia and Finland also host projects relevant for the automotive industry and mVisitors. It should be added that numerous cases in the Living Labs Global Showcase are focusing on mVisitors. As an illustration the following cases are mentioned: Tourist services in Barcelona utilising Bluetooth access points to enable local interactive multimedia services on the mobile (FuturLink); Mobile Marketing in Urban Spaces in Hamburg (with collaboration in Catalunya, Budapest and Vaestervik); Mobile city information system in Stuttgart; Oyster card in London aiming at easy payments throughout the London public transportation with its 26 million travelers each day; Ticket@mobile by XSmart in the Greater Zürich Area; the city of Malmoe provides tourists with a so-called Instant Phone Guide; the Estonian project Audio Guide is available in 6 languages, visitors to Tallinn airport are welcomed via a Wifi area, a mobile positioning system called PinPointMgine in the city of Tartu is helping the visitors to find their way. Stefan Malmborg (Vaestervik) presented the mStrategy of Boat Meet (35.000 visitors 2005), jens Bley (Living Labs Germany) exposed some of the underlying marketing opportunities and infrastructures that should be considered for mVisitors: Train TV, 10.000 Multimedia Booths rolled out by T-Com. Despite this broad range of services, lessons were learnt also from Estonia, where these services are practically unknown to visitor. Marketing of mVisitor services therefore remains a key challenge, as they often rely entirely on the mobile phone (unlike the Mobile Marketing in Urban Spaces model which interlinks traditional with mobile information channels). Whilst impressive solutions where reported from Tallinn, awareness or experience (even by visitors in the rooom) were extremely low.

Another significant challenge raised were the roaming charges. Many visitors prefer not even to switch-on their devices for fear of unpredictable costs. Intransparency of costs (especially data roaming) makes users averse to exploring services. A map for 4 EUR download costs may not even be competitive with an extensive paper version. Examples were presented from the Netherlands (rent a PDA for your stay) or Hong Kong (get a local SIM card with your tourist map) indicate some of the helplessness of some regions in trying to open the mTourism channel.