Pilot

10 Steps: Taking an Innovation for a City from Idea to Deployment

After a first round of consultation of experts and city professionals, Agile Cities is launching the first draft of its 10 stage process to take innovative ideas to full implementation in cities.

You can comment on the 10 Steps and the Draft text here.

One of the objectives of the Agile Cities initiative is to provide more reliable communication in the marketplace around innovative solutions that can transform communities.

A key element of this is to begin to establish a process to track the stages which a typical innovation passes through from Idea to Deployment. After an initial consultation process, we have edited a 10 Step Process which is now open for comment in an iterated editorial process.

You can add ideas by going directly to the open text document here or by commenting on this post.

THIS POST WAS ORIGINALLY POSTED ON AGILECITIES.ORG

LLGA Winners Pilot: Barcelona can Visualize Traffic Flows in Real-Time

Bitcarrier’s CitySolver Showcase was announced Winner of the Barcelona Category at the Living Labs Global Award 2011 at the Award Ceremony in Stockholm, by Anna Majo, Director of the 22@ Barcelona Innovation District. Barcelona’s jury reviewed more than 75 solutions and in the end chose Bitcarrier as bearing the biggest impact on its challenge to automate urban services.[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iv-2MXcq1_M]

CitySolver is a solution based on wireless network technology and takes advantage of the proliferation of mobile devices. It is composed of proprietary software (a management platform) and hardware (a sensor for urban environments). CitySolver’s visualization platform allows the clients to get real time traffic information on different routes defined. Information regarding travel times, average speeds, and traffic volume is delivered to users and managers directly; sensors can be installed on existing urban furniture and do not require street closures or other expensive roadwork.

Since the announcement, Bitcarrier worked with the Urban Lab team of 22@ Barcelona to plan the implementation of a pilot as part of a larger consortium to combine traditional and new forms of capturing urban mobility data. Winning the Living Labs Global Award was critical to gain visibility and build trust with Barcelona’s city officials, creating the reference that CitySolver is indeed a new, viable and efficient solution for managing and controlling urban traffic.

Already in August the first phase was completed and included 14 Bitcarrier URBAN sensors installed in the Eixample Area of Barcelona. The consistent and homogenised data is published in real-time to a website accessible to the pilot’s consortium partners and that can be used for new application development to serve traffic managers, fleet managers, and end-users .

New applications and services based on this real-time information can as a result include short-term journey-time predictions and an active traffic management system, drawing also pedestrian movements and estimations of inter-modal changes based on the electronic footprint of mobile devices.

The pilot partners studied and evaluated the radius of detection for each sensor and the quality of data obtained to optimise the location for the sensors in the next phase, which will include 36 additional sensors. This second phase will be launched towards the end of 2011.

The Living Labs Global Award 2012 is open for entries until February 17, 2012.

LLGA Winner's Smart Waste Sensors Pilot Beam Hourly Updates in Barcelona

In February 2010 Urbiotica’s Showcase ‘Intelligent Urban Waste Management’ was announced at the Living Labs Global Awards as winner of the opportunity to pilot in Barcelona, specifically in the 22@ Urban Lab area.[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ql1kHhD0EiI]

Of course the Award was immediately providing a more direct way to access decision-makers within the municipality regarding innovation and procurement of urban services. So we quickly started conversations with all the stakeholders involved in the waste collection service –including the environmental department, the 22@ Urban Lab coordination and also Urbaser, the service company in charge of the waste collection for that area of the city.

Our goal was to use the pilot opportunity to prove that our technology provides an integral solution for significantly improving the waste collection process, both in terms of costs and quality of the service. Our wireless sensor networks –composed of active sensors, communication devices and middleware platforms to handle the data collected- provide real-time information of the fill level of each container so that collection routes can be optimized to save resources  and improve the overall service.

During 2010 we took care of agreements with the different stakeholders involved in the pilot regarding the best locations of the sensor and communication elements, the best installation procedures and the expected preliminary results of the project – for example, how to serve and treat the real-time data collected from the dumpsters. In the end 8 sensors where installed: 2 for plastic dumpsters, 2 for glass, 2 for paper, 1 for generic waste and 1 for organic waste.

Several communication elements were also installed in the corresponding street lamps. The result is that for the past 12 months, these 8 sensorized dumpsters are sending data about their fill level every 1 hour; the data is processed through our middleware and served as useful information directly to the municipality as well as the management system of Urbaser, the company providing the collection service.

The collaboration with the different stakeholders in the pilot has been constructive and fruitful. The results are positive and meet what we had expected initially: our system is now installed and running in a small area of Barcelona and we keep an active reporting with the municipality as well as the company in order to refine the whole process and extract valuable practices, which can be used to extend the solution to larger areas of the city and/or to other cities.

 

- Irene Compte, Urbiotica

The Living Labs Global Award 2012 is open for submissions. 22@ Barcelona is among 20 global cities calling for solutions to improve the lives of 100 Million citizens.

Good data: why we want it and what keeps us from having it

Living Labs Global will soon be announcing partner cities for its 2012 Showcase Award – a mechanism through which innovative solutions compete against each other to win the right to pilot in one of several global cities (see the 2011 Award categories).  Each partner city defines the specific challenge they face and specific solutions are then suggested. Without spoiling the announcement, I’ll note that several of our partner cities this round are concerned with better data.  What good does data do?  At the very least, it serves as the basis for good information – a synthesis of data that is meaningful to humans.  Good information can enable good decisions; at the very least, it enables informed decisions.  Good decisions, in this context, are those that are made with full knowledge of the nuances of a specific urban problem (e.g. not just that obesity rates are high, but that obesity rates are high among particular populations X, Y, and Z).  The power of the information is seen in the resulting focus of the solution on each nuance of the problem.

This round, our cities are focused on obesity, physical activity, tourism, food waste, energy, sustainability, housing, heritage, happiness, and health care, among other things.  I see three different barriers to better data among this group of categories:

  1. Access to private data by governments
  2. A lack of ability to monitor and/or synthesize certain data
  3. Loosely-defined concepts of interest (e.g. sustainability, happiness, heritage)

These three barriers (can you think of others?) will play a pivotal role in solutions designed to improve data, information, and decisions for our partner cities.  Keep an eye to our blog and Showcase to see what companies are coming up with.

- Terra Curtis

Iterative Planning

For good reason, planners are forced to consider decision for long periods of time.  Access to capital takes time, and because it is scarce, funders need to be sure investments are well-vetted and that many benefits will result. While I not only understand this necessity, but also appreciate such a forward-looking and long-term field, still I look to the tech world in envy for its rapid prototyping, iteration, and satisfaction with back-of-the-envelope calculations to justify experimentation.  Look at the speed of innovation in that field.  With the UK internet industry alone worth £100 billion, one could argue that more is at stake in their field than in ours (in the US, the last federal transportation bill set aside just $470 million annually). A balance is being sought between the two philosophies – slow, methodical decision-making vs. quick but data-backed experimentation – on San Francisco’s streets.  The city has found flexibility in pilot programs such as forcing private vehicles off Market Street, the pavement-to-parks program and newly-implemented mobile parklets.

However, what is still lacking in planning is data.  That’s one reason why technologists are so able to implement, test, change, and move on productively and efficiently.  There are clear performance measures and clear evidence when targets are not met.

This post is as much a statement of frustration as it is a plea for more focus on data in planning.  A recent post shared a video of mayoral candidates’ views of Gov 2.0 and open data, and highlighted the spectrum of perspectives on and understanding of the subject.  With the right person in office, the movement could become institutionalized, and planners should be verbal and enthusiastic about that prospect.  Planners need to be data-savvy and data-hungry.  We need to build programs like these into our plans today, where data is not only open to the public but open and accessible interdepartmentally, so planning can become more nimble.  Only then will we approach efficiency, more efficiently.

- Terra Curtis

 

Iterative Planning

For good reason, planners are forced to consider decision for long periods of time.  Access to capital takes time, and because it is scarce, funders need to be sure investments are well-vetted and that many benefits will result. While I not only understand this necessity, but also appreciate such a forward-looking and long-term field, still I look to the tech world in envy for its rapid prototyping, iteration, and satisfaction with back-of-the-envelope calculations to justify experimentation.  Look at the speed of innovation in that field.  With the UK internet industry alone worth £100 billion, one could argue that more is at stake in their field than in ours (in the US, the last federal transportation bill set aside just $470 million annually). A balance is being sought between the two philosophies – slow, methodical decision-making vs. quick but data-backed experimentation – on San Francisco’s streets.  The city has found flexibility in pilot programs such as forcing private vehicles off Market Street, the pavement-to-parks program and newly-implemented mobile parklets.

However, what is still lacking in planning is data.  That’s one reason why technologists are so able to implement, test, change, and move on productively and efficiently.  There are clear performance measures and clear evidence when targets are not met.

This post is as much a statement of frustration as it is a plea for more focus on data in planning.  A recent post shared a video of mayoral candidates’ views of Gov 2.0 and open data, and highlighted the spectrum of perspectives on and understanding of the subject.  With the right person in office, the movement could become institutionalized, and planners should be verbal and enthusiastic about that prospect.  Planners need to be data-savvy and data-hungry.  We need to build programs like these into our plans today, where data is not only open to the public but open and accessible interdepartmentally, so planning can become more nimble.  Only then will we approach efficiency, more efficiently.

- Terra Curtis

 

Eight Cities Announce Winners to Solve Major Urban Challenges at LLGA2011

The cities of Barcelona, Cape Town, Eindhoven, Lagos, San Francisco, Sant Cugat, Stockholm and Taipei announce the winners of the Living Labs Global Award 2011.

The Award presented the major challenges faced by these cities in the coming years, to which 245 companies from 30 countries responded by presenting their solutions. With rapidly growing populations, budget pressures due to the financial crisis and increasing international competition for investment, talent and tourists cities are looking for innovative approaches to remain competitive. Cities represent a major, yet complex market, spending an annual EUR 3.5 trillion in public procurement alone

The cities of Barcelona, Cape Town, Eindhoven, Lagos, San Francisco, Sant Cugat, Stockholm and Taipei have announced eight winning solutions that were selected by 45 international users out of 245 submissions from 30 countries. Winning solutions will now be piloted in the participating cities, to evaluate their impact to meet the challenges.

In a unique global effort, eight cities joined forces with Living Labs Global to present their pressing challenges to the global business and technology community.

Challenges put forward by cities include the need to provide more efficient and sustainable urban services such as lighting using latest LED technologies; to rethink city services in the light of open data and apps developed by interest groups; to overcome media piracy undermining native film industries through digital distribution systems; or the need to provide financing and support to social entrepreneurs in African cities. The winning solutions are:

City of Barcelona: Citysolver, by Bitcarrier

City of Cape Town:  Venture Capital Cultivator Fund, by PoweredbyVC

City of Eindhoven: Integral Solution for Urban Infrastructures (SIIUR), by bdigital

City of Lagos: Eggup | Sell your films while preventing piracy, by Eggup.com

City of San Francisco: Open Data as a Platform for Citizen Service Delivery, by Socrata Inc.

City of Sant Cugat: Smart Parking for Smart Urban Living, by Worldsensing

City of Stockholm: Spotscout, by Spotscout Inc.

City of Taipei: A+ Care: Smart Autonomous TeleHealth Care Service, by Netown

Winners were announced after an international two-round jury process under auspices of Living Labs Global, a non-profit association based in Copenhagen working with 40 cities and 450 companies around the world to promote service innovation in cities.

The Award Ceremony was attended by 200 participants from 20 countries in Stockholm as part of the Stockholm Summit for Service Innovation in Cities.

The Living Labs Global Award 2011 is a unique global process providing full accountability in the evaluation through independent experts. The Award was carried out in partnership with Oracle Corporation, Farglory and supporting organisations from around the world.

About the Living Labs Global Award

Living Labs Global is a non-profit association based in Copenhagen (Denmark), working with 40 cities and 450 companies and research centres in Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas with a mission to open the market for service innovation in cities and overcoming key technology, organisation and trade barriers.

The Living Labs Global Award is an annual process over 8 months in which cities present their challenges and provide guidance to the business and technology community on future investment plans and needs. Solution providers respond by submitting existing technologies as entries for evaluation by an international jury.

Follow results and the upcoming Living Labs Global Award 2012 on Twitter. Facts: More than 557,000 local governments provide services to more than 50% of the world’s population with an annual spending of 3.5 Trillion Euros per year. New technologies can radically improve transport and mobility systems, access to finance, media distribution, social services and other key areas of urban life.

Eight Cities Announce Winners to Solve Major Urban Challenges at LLGA2011

The cities of Barcelona, Cape Town, Eindhoven, Lagos, San Francisco, Sant Cugat, Stockholm and Taipei announce the winners of the Living Labs Global Award 2011.

The Award presented the major challenges faced by these cities in the coming years, to which 245 companies from 30 countries responded by presenting their solutions. With rapidly growing populations, budget pressures due to the financial crisis and increasing international competition for investment, talent and tourists cities are looking for innovative approaches to remain competitive. Cities represent a major, yet complex market, spending an annual EUR 3.5 trillion in public procurement alone

The cities of Barcelona, Cape Town, Eindhoven, Lagos, San Francisco, Sant Cugat, Stockholm and Taipei have announced eight winning solutions that were selected by 45 international users out of 245 submissions from 30 countries. Winning solutions will now be piloted in the participating cities, to evaluate their impact to meet the challenges.

In a unique global effort, eight cities joined forces with Living Labs Global to present their pressing challenges to the global business and technology community.

Challenges put forward by cities include the need to provide more efficient and sustainable urban services such as lighting using latest LED technologies; to rethink city services in the light of open data and apps developed by interest groups; to overcome media piracy undermining native film industries through digital distribution systems; or the need to provide financing and support to social entrepreneurs in African cities. The winning solutions are:

City of Barcelona: Citysolver, by Bitcarrier

City of Cape Town:  Venture Capital Cultivator Fund, by PoweredbyVC

City of Eindhoven: Integral Solution for Urban Infrastructures (SIIUR), by bdigital

City of Lagos: Eggup | Sell your films while preventing piracy, by Eggup.com

City of San Francisco: Open Data as a Platform for Citizen Service Delivery, by Socrata Inc.

City of Sant Cugat: Smart Parking for Smart Urban Living, by Worldsensing

City of Stockholm: Spotscout, by Spotscout Inc.

City of Taipei: A+ Care: Smart Autonomous TeleHealth Care Service, by Netown

Winners were announced after an international two-round jury process under auspices of Living Labs Global, a non-profit association based in Copenhagen working with 40 cities and 450 companies around the world to promote service innovation in cities.

The Award Ceremony was attended by 200 participants from 20 countries in Stockholm as part of the Stockholm Summit for Service Innovation in Cities.

The Living Labs Global Award 2011 is a unique global process providing full accountability in the evaluation through independent experts. The Award was carried out in partnership with Oracle Corporation, Farglory and supporting organisations from around the world.

About the Living Labs Global Award

Living Labs Global is a non-profit association based in Copenhagen (Denmark), working with 40 cities and 450 companies and research centres in Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas with a mission to open the market for service innovation in cities and overcoming key technology, organisation and trade barriers.

The Living Labs Global Award is an annual process over 8 months in which cities present their challenges and provide guidance to the business and technology community on future investment plans and needs. Solution providers respond by submitting existing technologies as entries for evaluation by an international jury.

Follow results and the upcoming Living Labs Global Award 2012 on Twitter. Facts: More than 557,000 local governments provide services to more than 50% of the world’s population with an annual spending of 3.5 Trillion Euros per year. New technologies can radically improve transport and mobility systems, access to finance, media distribution, social services and other key areas of urban life.

Future of Biking: Copenhagen Calls for Innovations

Copenhagen has one of the world’s most ambitious local climate policies, striving to become a zero-emission community by the year 2025. To achieve this commitment, the city already has put several measures and lines of investment into motion, actively collaborating with companies and technology experts. Together with Living Labs Global, the City of Copenhagen invites innovators, researchers and companies to present innovative mobility solutions that help to achieve the goal of integrating Bicycles fully into a new intelligent and integrated transport system for the city. Already today, more than 55% of residents in Copenhagen use the bicycle daily, creating opportunities for new applications of IT in entertainment and safety, but also to address the several barriers that continue to exist between the excellent public transport system and bicycle uses.

Call for Pilots: The future of biking in Copenhagen.

As a result, Copenhagen is inviting companies and organisations from around the world to present their solutions for a pilot this autumn (deadline 31st of August) to evaluate impact of new systems, policies, technologies or planning tools to achieve the goal of an attractive and fully integrated inter-modal transport system, incorporating the large percentage of bicycle usage.

Solutions can address, but do not need to be limited to, the following challenges:

  • Can bike paths be smarter and indicate dangers such as frost, indicate congestion or incorporate sensors to monitor activities and respond to usage needs and link to traffic light systems offering green waves for cyclists?
  • Can technology in bicycles such as health sensors, location information, theft protection, entertainment and fitness monitors be applied for entertainment, wellbeing, security and other purposes?
  • Can mobile services link bicycles and riders to social networks, provide news and updates, to pre-book bikes or reserve parking, to plan routes and other activities?
  • Can we integrate bicycle rides to get to destinations with other modes of public transport to give more inter-modal options for commuters?
  • Can we improve bicycle parking around key intersections and meeting points?
  • Can the health and well-being impact of bicycles be maximised and monitored in the city?
  • How can we improve security and safety in relation to bicycles?
  • Can we invent intelligent or smarter clothing to deal with different weather conditions and at the same time integrate into daily activities?
  • Can bicycles replace "service vehicles" for craftsmen in the inner city?
  • What can Copenhagen do for bicycle tourism?

Submitting your solution for a Pilot is simple:

  • Submit or update your Showcase at www.livinglabs-global.com/showcase for free to publish a short description of your solution. Submission Deadline: August 31st 2010.
  • Choose "Apply for a pilot of my Showcase in Copenhagen in autumn 2010".
  • Answer a short application form for evaluation.
  • The City of Copenhagen and Living Labs Global will announce results by September 15th 2010. You will receive a short report on the evaluation results.
  • If successful, you will enter discussions with the City of Copenhagen on implementation of the pilot immediately after selection. Pilots should be running at the latest on November 15th 2010 and run for around 1-6 months.