Applications

Eight Global Cities Launch Technology Award to Help 40 Million Citizens

Eight global cities from Europe, Asia, Africa and North America join us in a challenge to find innovative solutions to major societal problems by opening competition among international solution-, technology- and service providers. The eight winners of the Living Labs Global Showcase Award will be invited to pilot their solutions in these cities, proving the effectiveness of new solutions and offering a first step for innovative providers to enter new markets. http://www.livinglabs-global.com/flash/awards2011.swf

The participating cities, representing 40 million citizens from Europe, Africa, North America and Asia call for solutions that can solve some of their most pressing challenges:

  • Automation of Urban Services
  • Intelligent Urban Lighting Solutions for Social Interaction & Orientation
  • Venture finance for millions of African entrepreneurs
  • Sustainable Initiative on Intellectual Property Protection
  • Creating the Next Generation of Government
  • Solutions for digitally enabled accessible ecoCities
  • Intelligent Transport Solutions
  • Smart solutions for 10,000 Smart Houses, 16 Green Communities, 1 Eco-City

Oracle Corporation and Asia’s Farglory have been named as corporate partners for the 2011 Living Labs Global Award. Submissions follow the format of the Living Labs Global Showcase and can be submitted for free until the 28th of February 2011. A shortlist of the top 40 Showcases will be presented by the international juries on March 21st 2011. Winners will be announced at the Award Ceremony on May 12th 2011 at the Stockholm Summit on Service Innovation in Cities.

Behind each Category lies the commitment of a city to pilot the winning showcase, with full institutional support to evaluate the impact the solution can have on reaching the community’s objectives.

The Vector Project Visioning Workshop.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsDLzqWGrQk&w=425&h=350] At our Summit on Service Innovation last week in Copenhagen we ran 9 parallel Visioning Workshops, such as the one facilitated by Neil Clavin and Maya Wiseman on their Vector Project Showcase. The above video was edited by Viktorija Prak, a very talented student supporting Neil and Maya in the workshop, in which business leaders, strategists, researchers and cities invented new urban technologies to redefine the role of bikes in our cities.

We partner with Yasmo Live to offer a radically new networking experience

Yasmo Live announced today that it has entered a partnership with Living Labs Global, a pioneering initiative, led by European Cities, with the objective to promote innovation in services and mobility in cities. [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWykRwGow1k&w=425&h=350]

Yasmo Live will be offering its on-site networking services to maximise the delegates’ networking opportunities before, during and after the ‘Summit on Service Innovation in Cities’, November 24-25 in Copenhagen, where Yasmo Live will be offering its on-site networking services to maximise the delegates’ networking opportunities before, during and after the event.

Yasmo Live will allow users to search through picture-based profiles of fellow attendees directly on their phones, to identify contacts of interest instantly and to arrange on-the-spot meetings.

Sascha Haselmayer, General Director at Living Labs Global commented: ‘Mobility is a paradigm shift in which the user, as a citizen, professional or visitor, is expecting public and private services to be tailored to his needs, delivered on demand, anywhere. Yasmo Live fits perfectly with our mission to materialise the shift that new technologies are bringing and we are proud to be the early adopters of such an innovative networking tool at our conferences.’

Areti Kampyli, CEO of Yasmo Live, said: ‘We are thrilled to be partnering with Living Labs Global, whose objective is to make service innovation happen, as together we can create a springboard for technologies like Yasmo Live to improve our day-to-day lives.’

About Yasmo Live

Yasmo Live, www.yasmolive.com, is a real-time mobile conferencing tool that allows event attendees to see their fellow participants' profiles on their mobile’s screen at conferences supporting its service. Yasmo Live bridges delegates’ digital and real presence, using their mobile phones to enable them to search and display people's profiles that are physically nearby. It serves as the 'missing link' or 'mutual friend' event attendees wished they had, to help them meet the right people. The company is headquartered in London.

Pesinet: Micro-Insurance for Child Health Services in Mali

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=6832695&server=vimeo.com&show_title=1&show_byline=1&show_portrait=1&color=00ADEF&fullscreen=1&autoplay=0&loop=0

Flash animation from Anne Roos-Weil on Vimeo.

A nonprofit organization called Pesinet is using mobile phones and a basic java application to change the way that children are treated within the healthcare system in Mali. Though the system is basic enough--healthcare agents provide weekly checkups on children and relay the weekly results through a java-enabled application on their mobile phone to a doctor who then reviews the results--- it's strikes at the core barriers which prevent children from receiving healthcare provision in a timely fashion; The organizations founder, Ann Roos-Weil, identifies the three core barriers as: 1) access to healthcare, in many rural areas in Mali families simply do not have access to healthcare resources. 2) family finances, often times the cost of healthcare itself is prohibitively expensive. 3) An attitude towards healthcare and illness itself, often times families in Mali delay treatment until the illness is extremely advanced. As Roos-Weil puts it in rather stark terms: "In Sub-Sahara Africa you have a very, very high child mortality rate. […] In Mali, where our project is based, one child out of five dies before the age of five. What we realized is that they’re mostly dying because they don’t go to the doctor or the healthcare center early enough."

Creatively enough, the Roos-Weil's solution was to devise a system which addressed each barrier individually. Through the Pesinet program, healthcare agents visit villages on a weekly basis and report on the health of a child to a trained physician through their mobile phones. Moreover, the Pesinet system provides a micro-insurance program in which a family pays a monthly 1 euro fee to participate. In effect this covers the cost of the healthcare agents visit, a visit to the doctor if it is deemed necessary and half the cost of medication should any be prescribed. Lastly, the weekly healthcare agent visits prevent families from waiting too long in the case that a child falls violently ill.

Mobile phones have enabled the program to reach many more children than would have otherwise been possible. According to Roos-Weil "What we found useful in mobile technology is mostly a case of efficiency in the way health workers do their work. Because basically, while using mobile technology you can ensure that the agent is having proximity to families, so she can do the home-based check-up while seeing a lot of children in a short time, which allows the doctor to follow up on a great number of children. Mobile technology, in our case, […] allows a model whereby we can touch a great volume of children while using just one doctor."

To learn more about Pesinet, click here.

Pesinet: Micro-Insurance for Child Health Services in Mali

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=6832695&server=vimeo.com&show_title=1&show_byline=1&show_portrait=1&color=00ADEF&fullscreen=1&autoplay=0&loop=0

Flash animation from Anne Roos-Weil on Vimeo.

A nonprofit organization called Pesinet is using mobile phones and a basic java application to change the way that children are treated within the healthcare system in Mali. Though the system is basic enough--healthcare agents provide weekly checkups on children and relay the weekly results through a java-enabled application on their mobile phone to a doctor who then reviews the results--- it's strikes at the core barriers which prevent children from receiving healthcare provision in a timely fashion; The organizations founder, Ann Roos-Weil, identifies the three core barriers as: 1) access to healthcare, in many rural areas in Mali families simply do not have access to healthcare resources. 2) family finances, often times the cost of healthcare itself is prohibitively expensive. 3) An attitude towards healthcare and illness itself, often times families in Mali delay treatment until the illness is extremely advanced. As Roos-Weil puts it in rather stark terms: "In Sub-Sahara Africa you have a very, very high child mortality rate. […] In Mali, where our project is based, one child out of five dies before the age of five. What we realized is that they’re mostly dying because they don’t go to the doctor or the healthcare center early enough."

Creatively enough, the Roos-Weil's solution was to devise a system which addressed each barrier individually. Through the Pesinet program, healthcare agents visit villages on a weekly basis and report on the health of a child to a trained physician through their mobile phones. Moreover, the Pesinet system provides a micro-insurance program in which a family pays a monthly 1 euro fee to participate. In effect this covers the cost of the healthcare agents visit, a visit to the doctor if it is deemed necessary and half the cost of medication should any be prescribed. Lastly, the weekly healthcare agent visits prevent families from waiting too long in the case that a child falls violently ill.

Mobile phones have enabled the program to reach many more children than would have otherwise been possible. According to Roos-Weil "What we found useful in mobile technology is mostly a case of efficiency in the way health workers do their work. Because basically, while using mobile technology you can ensure that the agent is having proximity to families, so she can do the home-based check-up while seeing a lot of children in a short time, which allows the doctor to follow up on a great number of children. Mobile technology, in our case, […] allows a model whereby we can touch a great volume of children while using just one doctor."

To learn more about Pesinet, click here.

What is a Mobile Economy? Let's Look to Africa

In May, the research firm Generator Research published a report in which they projected that the worldwide market for mobile payments will grow to 633.4 billion by 2014; the report was picked up by Gigaom and a number of mobile-savvy blogs, getting enough dissemination to make most entrepreneurs drool over the possibilities for growth and implementation. While entrepreneurs may be drooling over this, the question remains, what does a mobile economy really mean for most of us? Later last month, I happened upon an interview with Ethan Zuckerman, a senior researcher at Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society. In the interview, Ethan suggests that if we want to know what a mobile economy might look like, we should probably look to Africa for a clue. Without an established and easily accessible banking infrastructure, much of Africa has leapfrogged the former infrastructure and, consequently, embraced mobile payments.

Throughout the interview, Zuckerman offers up gems of insights about mobile markets and economies and what's in it for us. He's also careful to point out barriers to entry and other factors which may continue to discourage use; most notably, mobile payment carrier charges which can account for as much as 50% of the original payment.

You can listen to the full interview here.

What's new in Mobile Health?

I've rounded up a number of interesting mobile health gadgets that have emerged on the market over the last 6 months. Here are a collection of self-explanatory videos which give us a pretty good glimpse at how these gadgets work and how they can be used. Check them out below: MedApps A mobile outpatient monitoring solution that proactively alerts doctors and nurses to potential health problems. [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txSnlKzbn18&color1=0xb1b1b1&color2=0xd0d0d0&hl=en_US&feature=player_embedded&fs=1]

LookTel An application that helps the visually impaired recognize objects.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uFPsF8GBfqE&color1=0xb1b1b1&color2=0xd0d0d0&hl=en_US&feature=player_embedded&fs=1]

PillPhone A mobile application that helps consumers better manage their medication. [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZAIhxha8FOw&color1=0xb1b1b1&color2=0xd0d0d0&hl=en_US&feature=player_embedded&fs=1]

Mobile Phones as Virtual Wallets

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=suCe4-SWsHo&hl=en_US&fs=1&] Our mobile society may be trending towards a a time when mobile phones serve as our wallets, too. The video above demonstrates an application released by PayPal this past March. I know, paying with one's mobile phone isn't entirely novel on the global scale; from mobile metering to mobile ticketing, many forward-thinking places have integrated the technology into their infrastructure. Yet, the PayPal application remains relevant as it introduces a degree of physicality otherwise lacking in my comparable services. Using the technology from the company, Bump Technologies, the application allows a purchaser to send money by choosing a recipient from their contact list, or to transfer money by simply tapping the phones together.

The app includes a feature to help split a check, factoring in tax and tip and whether someone owes more than the others at the table. Payments are free from a bank or PayPal account, and there are varying fees if the payer uses a credit card.

Sure, there are other models out there-- but for now, PayPal's app won us over with it's sheer simplicity.

Mobile Phones as Virtual Wallets

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=suCe4-SWsHo&hl=en_US&fs=1&] Our mobile society may be trending towards a a time when mobile phones serve as our wallets, too. The video above demonstrates an application released by PayPal this past March. I know, paying with one's mobile phone isn't entirely novel on the global scale; from mobile metering to mobile ticketing, many forward-thinking places have integrated the technology into their infrastructure. Yet, the PayPal application remains relevant as it introduces a degree of physicality otherwise lacking in my comparable services. Using the technology from the company, Bump Technologies, the application allows a purchaser to send money by choosing a recipient from their contact list, or to transfer money by simply tapping the phones together.

The app includes a feature to help split a check, factoring in tax and tip and whether someone owes more than the others at the table. Payments are free from a bank or PayPal account, and there are varying fees if the payer uses a credit card.

Sure, there are other models out there-- but for now, PayPal's app won us over with it's sheer simplicity.

Speech Therapy and Mobile Phones

The young, innovative company Smarty Ears is beginning to positively shake things up in the world of speech therapy by creating innovative applications for iPhones, iPods and iPads. The applications are designed for use by speech and language therapists as well as individuals with speech impairments.

Though Smarty Ears was only created in August of 2010, it has released ten such applications via the Apple App Store; Amongst its most popular products is “Mobile Articulation Probes” – an exciting original app that allows for practicing and probing of articulation errors, “WHQuestions” – a great app that provides over 120 Wh questions for practice, “ iPractice Verbs” – an innovative app with visual and auditory information on over 130 verbs at the word and phrase level, “Fluency Tracker” – a handy app that allows for tracking of changes in behaviors associated with stuttering.

Though Smarty Ears does not promise to replace the role of speech pathologists, it does empower individuals and their parents to work independently on their specific challenges, tracking improvements and highlighting the most formidable challenges. And by doing it through mobile phones and applications, Smarty Ears makes therapy more affordable.

Apple Heart Monitor

<img alt="" src="http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4052/4598228273_3f6e5f29d9.jpg" title="Apple Cardiac Monitor" class="alignnone" width="298" height="500" / Earlier this month apple filed a patent for an iPhone embedded heart monitor---in the patent itself, Apple tells us the following about the technology:

This is directed to an electronic device having an integrated sensor for detecting a user's cardiac activity and cardiac electrical signals. The electronic device can include a heart sensor having several leads for detecting a user's cardiac signals. The leads can be coupled to interior surfaces of the electronic device housing to hide the sensor from view, such that electrical signals generated by the user can be transmitted from the user's skin through the electronic device housing to the leads. In some embodiments, the leads can be coupled to pads placed on the exterior of the housing. The pads and housing can be finished to ensure that the pads are not visibly or haptically distinguishable on the device, thus improving the aesthetic qualities of the device. Using the detected signals, the electronic device can identify or authenticate the user and perform an operation based on the identity of the user. In some embodiments, the electronic device can determine the user's mood from the cardiac signals and provide data related to the user's mood.

Though I'm a bit skeptical of any gadget's ability to predict my mood (even one designed by apple), I think this addition will be interesting for other reasons. Certainly, health fanatics and exercise enthusiasts should rejoice---I don't doubt that there will be a flood of new bio-feedback applications for ipods and iPhones equipped with this technology.

Add a new line to your Smart Phone

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rMXlCpcc6RA&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0] A new application, Line2, is shaking up established cell phone user models by allowing an iPhone-user (for now---Android users should get their fill in a few months) to add a second line to their mobile phone, therein enabling them to establish a separate contact list, voicemail, etc.

Toktumi, the company behind the Application, envisions that mobile phone users will use the app to create an easy separation between their personal and professional lives, distributing the line2 number to business contacts and retaining their original number for family and friends.

For those of you pinching minutes at the end of each month, you'll be especially delighted by line2's dual-mode functionality which allows you to make phone calls over your carrier's network or over the internet; in fact, anytime you have access to a hotspot, line2 places calls over wifi.

After the first month, satisfied users will have to pay a reasonable 15 dollar a month subscription fee. To learn more about the service, check out the video above.