Android

Cycletracks

In November 2009, the San Francisco County Transportation Authority (SFCTA) unveiled a new app for the iPhone and Android systems called Cycletracks. The app’s release signals a great step forward in municipal data collection and analysis by using mobile technology for social benefit.  By downloading and using the app, San Francisco’s cyclists can record and report their bicycle trips throughout the City.  Along with trip length and duration in time, the user can also report the purpose of the trip: social, exercise, work-related, shopping, errand, etc.

It’s useful enough on an individual basis (ever wanted to know just how far you bike around town?).  But perhaps more importantly, all this data gets aggregated anonymously and sent back to the SFCTA who uses it to inform its sophisticated SF-CHAMP modeling a travel forecasting tool.  SF-CHAMP is used by City planners to determine the effects of land use, development, and other local decisions on travel behavior.

Word is that the app can actually be used anywhere.  Portland, OR has already been in touch with the developers to try to tailor it to their needs.  Might your city be interested?

Government and Transit 2.0

The concept of Government 2.0 is buzzing around the conversations of freelance developers and public officials alike.  The idea is to create transparency of government and to facilitate better communication between decision makers and affected populations. It is such a popular topic at the moment that a simple search of Twitter reveals 45 people talking about it in the last hour alone.  The people tweeting include the CIO of the City of Edmonton, an internet radio broadcaster, a mobile app developer, an issue documenting web service called SeeClickFix, and Katie Jacobs Stanton, Barack Obama's appointee to the position of Director of Citizen Participation.  She worked at Google previously.

Government 2.0 so far has manifested itself in a variety of examples. Routsey is an iPhone app that allows users to access public bus routes and schedules in San Francisco.  It uses data from nextbus.com. BART Droid is a similar app for Google's Android system that connects users with public transit data for BART, the San Francisco Bay Area's regional train system.  It includes a zoom-able system map and fares and uses data from bart.gov.  The State of Massachusetts Department of Transportation hosts a developers' webpage with resources and links to available real-time and static transportation data.  Recently, the Department held a developers challenge to produce software of physical installations using the publicly-available data.  The results were impressive and saved the state tens of thousands of dollars.  A national example is SeeClickFix, which "matches issues and fixes by keyword and geography."

Government and Transit 2.0

The concept of Government 2.0 is buzzing around the conversations of freelance developers and public officials alike.  The idea is to create transparency of government and to facilitate better communication between decision makers and affected populations. It is such a popular topic at the moment that a simple search of Twitter reveals 45 people talking about it in the last hour alone.  The people tweeting include the CIO of the City of Edmonton, an internet radio broadcaster, a mobile app developer, an issue documenting web service called SeeClickFix, and Katie Jacobs Stanton, Barack Obama's appointee to the position of Director of Citizen Participation.  She worked at Google previously.

Government 2.0 so far has manifested itself in a variety of examples. Routsey is an iPhone app that allows users to access public bus routes and schedules in San Francisco.  It uses data from nextbus.com. BART Droid is a similar app for Google's Android system that connects users with public transit data for BART, the San Francisco Bay Area's regional train system.  It includes a zoom-able system map and fares and uses data from bart.gov.  The State of Massachusetts Department of Transportation hosts a developers' webpage with resources and links to available real-time and static transportation data.  Recently, the Department held a developers challenge to produce software of physical installations using the publicly-available data.  The results were impressive and saved the state tens of thousands of dollars.  A national example is SeeClickFix, which "matches issues and fixes by keyword and geography."